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Counting in Kala

Language overview

Forty-two in Kala Kala is a personal constructed language designed by Carl Buck since late 2009. It is based on Classical Nahuatl for its phonemic inventory, Japanese for its syllable structure and vowels, Bantu languages for its prenasalized stops, while its lexemes are derived from or inspired by natural languages, like Arabic, Mandarin, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Turkish, and several others. The Kala language can be written in Latin script, in Moya (a calligraphic abugida), in Omyatloko (a set of logosyllabic glyphs reminiscent of Mayan glyphs, Japanese Kanji, or Chinese Hanzi), in Han Moya (an adaptation of the Hangul Korean alphabet), in Kenaya or Kenamoya (an abugida used for decorative purpose), or in Naua (a decorative cursive syllabic alphabet).

Kala numbers list

  • 1 – na’o
  • 2 – ta’o
  • 3 – ha’o
  • 4 – ma’o
  • 5 – ya’o
  • 6 – tsa’o
  • 7 – ka’o
  • 8 – pa’o
  • 9 – sa’o
  • 10 – ue’o
  • 11 – uena’o
  • 12 – ueta’o
  • 13 – ueha’o
  • 14 – uema’o
  • 15 – ueya’o
  • 16 – uetsa’o
  • 17 – ueka’o
  • 18 – uepa’o
  • 19 – uesa’o
  • 20 – taue’o
  • 30 – haue’o
  • 40 – maue’o
  • 50 – yaue’o
  • 60 – tsaue’o
  • 70 – kaue’o
  • 80 – paue’o
  • 90 – saue’o
  • 100 – nye’o
  • 1,000 – tle’o

Kala numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words, namely ye’o [0], na’o [1], ta’o [2], ha’o [3], ma’o [4], ya’o [5], tsa’o [6], ka’o [7], pa’o [8], and sa’o [9].
  • Tens are formed prefixing the word for ten (ue’o) with the root of its multiplier, except for ten itself: ue’o [10], taue’o [20], haue’o [30], maue’o [40], yaue’o [50], tsaue’o [60], kaue’o [70], paue’o [80], and saue’o [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the ten without its ’o ending, directly followed by the unit with no space (e.g.: tauetsa’o [26], yaueha’o [53]).
  • Hundreds are formed prefixing the word for hundred (nye’o) with the root of its multiplier, except for one hundred: nye’o [100], tanye’o [200], hanye’o [300], manye’o [400], yanye’o [500], tsanye’o [600], kanye’o [700], panye’o [800], and sanye’o [900].
  • Thousands are formed prefixing the word for thousand (tle’o) with the root of its multiplier, except for one thousand: tle’o [1,000], tatle’o [2,000], hatle’o [3,000], matle’o [4,000], yatle’o [5,000], tsatle’o [6,000], katle’o [7,000], patle’o [8,000], and satle’o [9,000].
  • Compound numbers above twenty-one can be expressed in two forms. The long form, where compounding elements are spelled out in extenso, is used in formal situations, including financial transactions, especially involving large sums. The short form, where the multiplier of each inner power of ten is kept, while the scale name is dropped (unless the following multiplier is zero, to prevent any confusion), is used in everyday speech and when calculating basic math. For instance, tauena’o or tana’o [21], yanyesauesa’o or yasasa’o [599], yatlesauesa’o or yatlesasa’o [5,099].
  • Higher scale numbers are mue’o [ten thousand, 104], kye’o [hundred thousand, 105], nte’o [million, 106], and hue’o [billion, 109].

Source

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Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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