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Counting in Siinyamda

Language overview

Forty-two in Siinyamda Siinyamda is an artistic language designed by Britton Watkins for the 2014 indie sci-fi film Senn directed by Josh Feldman. If its writing might look like Chinese or Korean to someone unfamiliar to these languages, it has been designed from the Roman alphabet. The Siinyamda language has been influenced by French, Italian and Portuguese for its phonology, by Japanese for its grammar, and by Cherokee for its verbs.

Siinyamda numbers list

  • 1 – al
  • 2 – iils
  • 3 – et
  • 4 – onn
  • 5 – uny
  • 6 – õj
  • 7 – ėrp
  • 8 – aunw
  • 9 – øìbr
  • 10 – uy
  • 11 – uyal
  • 12 – uyiils
  • 13 – uyet
  • 14 – uyonn
  • 15 – uyuny
  • 16 – uyõj
  • 17 – uyėrp
  • 18 – uyaunw
  • 19 – uyøìbr
  • 20 – iilsuy
  • 30 – etuy
  • 40 – onnuy
  • 50 – unyuy
  • 60 – õjuy
  • 70 – ėrpuy
  • 80 – aunwuy
  • 90 – øìbruy
  • 100 – ezl
  • 1,000 – iisr

Siinyamda numerals

0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9

Siinyamda numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • In Siinyamda, numbers are verbs, and represented by a root. For instance, the root øìbr means to be nine.
  • Numbers are inserted into text in their digit form, with appropriate grammatical markers attached directly to the number form. In the sentence Tunn’ej gennra’sh tetezlonnuyunyė. (which means There are already 345 of them here.), the number 345, .etezlonnuyuny., is prefixed by the marker t, third animate augmented, which expresses the plural of animate objects (probably persons in that example), and suffixed by the marker ė, for the present tense.
  • Numbers can also use the attributive marker -oì, which turns a stative verb into an adjective. Four dogs can be expressed as tonnoì chyẽ, with the subject marker t, or onnoì chyẽ, without it.
  • For the sake of simplification, the numbers presented here will consist of their root, with no grammatical marker attached to it.
  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words: ìr [0], al [1], iils [2], et [3], onn [4], uny [5], õj [6], ėrp [7], aunw [8], and øìbr [9].
  • Tens are formed starting with the multiplier digit, directly followed by the word for ten (uy), except for ten itself: uy [10], iilsuy [20], etuy [30], onnuy [40], unyuy [50], õjuy [60], ėrpuy [70], aunwuy [80], and øìbruy [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the ten, directly followed by the unit, with no space (e.g.: unyuyonn [54], ėrpuyiils [72]).
  • Hundreds are formed starting with the multiplier digit, directly followed by the word for hundred (ezl), except for one hundred: ezl [100], iilsezl [200], etezl [300], onnezl [400], unyezl [500], õjezl [600], ėrpezl [700], aunwezl [800], and øìbrezl [900].
  • Thousands are formed starting with the multiplier digit, directly followed by the word for thousand (iisr), except for one thousand: iisr [1,000], iilsiisr [2,000], etiisr [3,000], onniisr [4,000], unyiisr [5,000], õjiisr [6,000], ėrpiisr [7,000], aunwiisr [8,000], and øìbriisr [9,000].
  • Tens of thousand are formed starting with the multiplier digit, directly followed by the word for ten thousand (olt), except for ten thousand: olt [10,000], iilsolt [20,000], etolt [30,000]…
  • Hundreds of thousand are formed starting with the multiplier digit, directly followed by the word for hundred thousand (ery), except for ten thousand: ery [100,000], iilsery [200,000], etery [300,000]…

Source

  • Siinyamda, by Britton Watkins and William S. Annis

Other artistic languages

Atlantean, Atrian, Ayeri, Azazilúŝ, Barsoomian, Belter Creole, Dai, Dovahzul, D’ni, Elder Speech, Giak, Hylian, Illitan, Ithkuil, Itláni, Kēlen, Kiitra, KiLiKi, Láadan, Na’vi, Shiväisith, Siinyamda, Trigedasleng, Va Ehenív, Verdurian, and Wardwesân.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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