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Counting in Dai

Language overview

Forty-two in Dai The Dai language is the first professional conlang of David J. Peterson, the creator of Dothraki (Game of Thrones) and Trigedasleng (The 100) to cite only two. It was developped in late 2000 for a Dungeons & Dragons students group in Oklahoma.

Dai numbers list

  • 1 – ren
  • 2 – sop
  • 3 – taʃ
  • 4 – boθ
  • 5 – kud
  • 6 – peŋ
  • 7 – dem
  • 8 – got
  • 9 – hez
  • 10 – iren
  • 11 – reniren
  • 12 – sopiren
  • 13 – taʃiren
  • 14 – boθiren
  • 15 – kudiren
  • 16 – peŋiren
  • 17 – demiren
  • 18 – gotiren
  • 19 – heziren
  • 20 – isop
  • 30 – itaʃ
  • 40 – iboθ
  • 50 – ikud
  • 60 – ipeŋ
  • 70 – idem
  • 80 – igot
  • 90 – ihez
  • 100 – uren
  • 1,000 – oren
  • one million – aren
  • one billion – eren
  • one trillion – iziren

Dai numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words: ðuz [0], ren [1], sop [2], taʃ [3], boθ [4], kud [5], peŋ [6], dem [7], got [8], and hez [9].
  • The tens are formed prefixing the multiplier digit with the letter i: iren [10], isop [20], itaʃ [30], iboθ [40], ikud [50], ipeŋ [60], idem [70], igot [80], and ihez [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the unit, directly followed by the ten, with no space (e.g.: boθisop [24], gotidem [78]).
  • The hundreds are formed prefixing the multiplier digit with the letter u, nine hundred being an exception as it undergoes some consonant change: uren [100], usop [200], utaʃ [300], uboθ [400], ukud [500], upeŋ [600], udem [700], ugot [800], and uzeʒ [900].
  • Hundreds are linked with with units or tens with a hyphen (e.g.: uren-reniren [111], upeŋ-gotidem [678]).
  • The thousands are formed prefixing the multiplier digit with the letter o: oren [1,000], osop [2,000], otaʃ [3,000], oboθ [4,000], okud [5,000], opeŋ [6,000], odem [7,000], ogot [8,000], and ohez [9,000].
  • Higher scale numbers (million, billion, trillion, quadrillion, quintillion) are formed prefixing the multiplier digit with respectively a, e, izi, uzu, and ozo: aren [1 million], esop [2 billions], izitaʃ [3 trillions], uzuboθ [4 quadrillions], ozokud [5 quintillions].
  • When compound, higher scale numbers are grouped by three, separated with commas, like in the English language (e.g.: akud, ouzeʒ-taʃisop, upeŋ-gotidem [5,923,678]). It is also to be noticed that when compound, hundreds of thousands take both the thousand and hundred prefixes: ouzeʒ-taʃisop [923,000] can be understood as nine hundred thousands and twenty-three.

Write a number in full in Dai

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Dai. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Sources

Other artistic languages

Atlantean, Atrian, Azazilúŝ, Barsoomian, Belter Creole, Dai, Dovahzul, D’ni, Elder Speech, Giak, Hylian, Illitan, Ithkuil, Itláni, Kiitra, Láadan, Na’vi, Shiväisith, Trigedasleng, Va Ehenív, and Wardwesân.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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