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Counting in Arodjun

Language overview

Forty-two in Arodjun Arodjun (Kat jArodjunx) is a conlang, and more specifically an a priori artistic naturalistic constructed language. It is designed by Robert Cole, known for his Agma Schwa YouTube channel.
Arodjun is a Sern-Cahilan language developped among others for his Dog Days world. It is primarily spoken in the Fwonnel Peninsula by dog people with mouths pretty much identical to those of humans. The Dog Days world is our world, but two million years in the future, and the Fwonnel Peninsula is a region southwest of modern-day Mexico.
In Arodjun, nouns are either physical or nonphysical. They come in five cases: nominative, accusative, dative, genitive, and animate genitive. The language follows a Verb-Object-Subject word order, and is mostly analytical. Its counting system is a hybrid decimal-dozenal system. Historically fully dozenal, the Prins invasion in 900 AR introduced the decimal system. A lot of decimal numbers are thus of Prins origin; Prins, or Pirnshex, being also a Sern-Cahilan language.

Arodjun numbers list

  • 1 – xwe
  • 2 – ro
  • 3 – qlu
  • 4 – pa
  • 5 – ek
  • 6 – qladex
  • 7 – mjadax
  • 8 – njanji
  • 9 – qlojax
  • 10 – kek
  • 11 – xore
  • 12 – sju
  • 13 – sjuxwe
  • 14 – sjuro
  • 15 – kekek
  • 16 – sjudex
  • 17 – sjumjadax
  • 18 – sjadex
  • 19 – sjaxwex
  • 20 – rokek
  • 30 – qlukek
  • 40 – pakek
  • 50 – ekek
  • 60 – qlakek
  • 70 – mjadakek
  • 80 – njanjikek
  • 90 – qlojukek
  • 100 – mjare

Arodjun numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from one to nine are rendered by specific words, namely: xwe [1], ro [2], qlu [3], pa [4], ek [5] (of Prins origin), qladex [6], mjadax [7], njanji [8], and qlojax [9].
  • Tens are of Prins origin, and they follow a decimal system. They are formed starting with the multiplier unit root prefixing the word for ten (kek), except for ten itself: kek [10], rokek [20], qlukek [30], pakek [40], ekek [50], qlakek [60], mjadakek [70], njanjikek [80], and qlojukek [90].
  • Arodjun counting system being originally duodecimal, or dozenal (of base 12), eleven and twelve also have their own word, while other numbers up to nineteen can be formed on twelve: xore [11], sju [12], sjuxwe [13] (12+1), sjuro [14] (12+2), kekek [15] (10+5, of Pins origin), sjudex [16] (12~6, which mixes the two bases, making 12 play the role of 10), sjumjadax [17] (12~7, same etymology as sixteen), sjadex [18], and sjaxwex [19].
  • The dozenal system is still present in the multiples of twelve: kjum [24] (2*12), tjum [36] (3*12), pjam [48] (4*12), qlajam [48] (6*12), mjajam [84] (7*12), njajan [96] (8*12), qlojem [108] (9*12), xjom [132] (11*12), and usjum [144] (12*12).
  • Compound numbers from twenty-one to twenty-three are irregular: sjarqlu [21] (12+9), sjarpa [22], and sjarek [23].
  • Compound numbers between those multiples of twelve are regular above twenty-four (excluding the multiples of twelve). They start with the ten, directly followed by the unit with no space (e.g.: rokekek [25], qlukekxwe [31], ekekpa [54]).
  • Hundreds are formed on a decimal base, starting with the multiplier unit root prefixing the word for hundred (mjare), except for one hundred and five hundred: mjare [100], romjare [200], qlumjare [300], pamjare [400], doke [500], qlamjare [600], mjadamjare [700], njanjimjare [800], and qlojumjare [900].
  • Compound hundreds are formed starting with the hundred, then the ten or the unit linked with a hyphen (e.g.: mjare-qlukek [130], mjare-ekek [150], romjare-qlu [203]).
  • Powers of ten starting with ten thousand are of Prins origin: kekdoke [10,000, or 104], mjaredoke [100,000, or 105], slat [1 million, or 106], kekslat [10 million, or 107], xuslat [100 million, or 108], and xuguslat [1 billion, or 109].

Write a number in full in Arodjun

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Arodjun. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Books

A Grammar of the Arodjun Language A Grammar of the Arodjun Language
by , editors Robert Cole (2021)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Source

  • Dog Days, a webcomic by Agma Schwa (in English or Arodjun)

Other artistic languages

Aczu Śavnecze, Aramteskan, Arodjun, Atlantean, Atrian, Ayeri, Azazilúŝ, Barsoomian, Bayën, Belter Creole, Brooding, Chakobsa, Dai, Dovahzul, D’ni, Elder Speech, Engála, Epigean, Giak, Grayis, Gryomian, Hiuʦɑθ, Hylian, Illitan, Ithkuil, Itláni, Kala, Kēlen, Kiitra, KiLiKi, Láadan, Mini, Mondir, Na’vi, Neziba, Nìmpyèshiu, Santaa, Shiväisith, Siinyamda, Toki Pona, Tpaalha, Trigedasleng, Tüchte, Va Ehenív, Valthungian, Verdurian, Wardwesân, and Wóxtjanato.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.