Counting in Gryomian

Language overview

Forty-two in Gryomian Gryomian (Grömki) is a holy conlang dedicated to Grömya (Gryomia), a post-human astral civilization created by the Brazilian Ebrael S. In this post-apocalypitic human future set in the planetary system of Svika, a.k.a. Vega, Ebrael tells us what an entity called Mikhael had showed to him about Universal Chronology, Mankind’s history and more. The Gryomian language is written in an adapted Latin alphabet of 31 letters, and also in an adapted Cyrillic script for sacred texts.

Gryomian numbers list

  • 1 – ë
  • 2 – më
  • 3 – trë
  • 4 – gem
  • 5 – sör
  • 6 – ven
  • 7 – tëv
  • 8 – gun
  • 9 – frë
  • 10 – eg
  • 11 – ege-ë
  • 12 – ege-më
  • 13 – ege-trë
  • 14 – ege-gem
  • 15 – ege-sör
  • 16 – ege-ven
  • 17 – ege-tëv
  • 18 – ege-gun
  • 19 – ege-frë
  • 20 – meg
  • 30 – treg
  • 40 – gmeg
  • 50 – soreg
  • 60 – vneg
  • 70 – tveg
  • 80 – gneg
  • 90 – freg
  • 100 – egag
  • 1,000 – ë-gon
  • one million – ë-borda
  • one billion – ë-mirta
  • one trillion – ë-terda

Gryomian numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from one to nine are rendered by specific words, namely ë [1], [2], trë [3], gem [4], sör [5], ven [6], tëv [7], gun [8], and frë [9].
  • Tens are formed starting by the unaccented multiplier digit suffixed with (e)g, with some elisions (like for instance veneg which gives vneg): eg [10], meg [20], treg [30], gmeg [40], soreg [50], vneg [60], tveg [70], gneg [80], and freg [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the ten, suffixed with the letter e, linked to the unit with a hyphen (e.g.: trege-ven [36], sorege-tëv [57]).
  • Hundreds are formed suffixing the multiplier ten with ag, thus making the hundreds tens of tens: egag [100], megag [200], tregag [300], gmegag [400], soregag [500], vnegag [600], tvegag [700], gnegag [800], and fregag [900].
  • Thousands are formed starting with the multiplier digit linked with a hyphen to the word for thousand (singular: gon; plural: goney): ë-gon [1,000], më-goney [2,000], trë-goney [3,000], gem-goney [4,000], sör-goney [5,000], ven-goney [6,000], tëv-goney [7,000], gun-goney [8,000], and frë-goney [9,000].
  • Tens of thousands are formed the same way, the plural form of the word for thousand being prefixed with the letter ë, except for ten thousand: ege-goney [10,000], meg-ëgoney [20,000], treg-ëgoney [30,000]…
  • Hundreds of thousands revert to the regular thousands pattern: egag-goney [100,000], megag-goney [200,000], tregag-goney [300,000]…
  • Millions (106) are formed starting with the multiplier digit linked with a hyphen to the word for million (singular: borda; plural: borday): ë-borda [1 million], më-borday [2 million], trë-borday [3 million]…
  • Billions (109) are formed starting with the multiplier digit linked with a hyphen to the word for billion (singular: mirta; plural: mirtay): ë-mirta [1 billion], më-mirtay [2 billion], trë-mirtay [3 billion]…
  • Trillions (1012) are formed starting with the multiplier digit linked with a hyphen to the word for trillion (singular: terda; plural: terday): ë-terda [1 trillion], më-terday [2 trillion], trë-terday [3 trillion]…

Write a number in full in Gryomian

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Gryomian. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

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