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Counting in KiLiKi

Language overview

Forty-two in KiLiKi KiLiKi is a fictional language created by the Indian screenwriter Madhan Karky Vairamuthu for the 2015 Indian epic adventure film Baahubali: The Beginning where it is spoken by the Kalakeya tribe. The language appears also in the 2017 sequel of the movie: Baahubali 2: The Conclusion. The KiLiKi language is written using 22 symbols, and includes five clicks.

Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 10,000 in KiLiKi. Please contact me if you can help me counting up from that limit.

KiLiKi numbers list

  • 1 – unO
  • 2 – dunO
  • 3 – movO
  • 4 – chovO
  • 5 – fibO
  • 6 – sibO
  • 7 – venO
  • 8 – renO
  • 9 – namO
  • 10 – tamO
  • 11 – un-tam-unO
  • 12 – un-tam-dunO
  • 13 – un-tam-movO
  • 14 – un-tam-chovO
  • 15 – un-tam-fibO
  • 16 – un-tam-sibO
  • 17 – un-tam-venO
  • 18 – un-tam-renO
  • 19 – un-tam-namO
  • 20 – dun-tamO
  • 30 – mov-tamO
  • 40 – chov-tamO
  • 50 – fib-tamO
  • 60 – sib-tamO
  • 70 – ven-tamO
  • 80 – ren-tamO
  • 90 – nam-tamO
  • 100 – taanO
  • 1,000 – taathO
  • ten thousand – tamathO

KiLiKi numerals

KiLiKi numeral glyphs are composed of as many strokes as the digit itself. Five is composed of a square (4) and an oblique line (1), and means 4+1. The glyph for six is made of two triangles for three, hence 2 times 3. Seven is an exception, as it is represented by a sun with seven strokes. The glyph for eight is made of two squares, or 2 times 4. The glyph for nine is the same as the one for eight, plus the oblique line of one, or 8+1.

0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9

KiLiKi numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words, namely: yO [0], unO [1], dunO [2], movO [3], chovO [4], fibO [5], sibO [6], venO [7], renO [8], and namO [9].
  • Tens are formed starting with the multiplier digit without its ending O, followed by the word for ten (tamO), linked with a hyphen, except for ten itself: tamO [10], dun-tamO [20], mov-tamO [30], chov-tamO [40], fib-tamO [50], sib-tamO [60], ven-tamO [70], ren-tamO [80], and nam-tamO [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the ten root (hence without its ending O), followed by the unit digit, linked with a hyphen (e.g.: dun-tam-venO [27], fib-tam-sibO [56]).
  • Hundreds are formed starting with the multiplier digit root (without its ending O), followed by the word for hundred (taanO), linked with a hyphen, except for one hundred: taanO [100], dun-taanO [200], mov-taanO [300], chov-taanO [400], fib-taanO [500], sib-taanO [600], ven-taanO [700], ren-taanO [800], and nam-taanO [900].
  • Thousands are formed starting with the multiplier digit root (without its ending O), followed by the word for thousand (taathO), linked with a hyphen, except for one thousand: taathO [1,000], dun-taathO [2], mov-taathO [3,000], chov-taathO [4,000], fib-taathO [5,000], sib-taathO [6,000], ven-taathO [7,000], ren-taathO [8,000], and nam-taathO [9,000].
  • The KiLiKi language uses the Indian counting system, or more exactly the counting system of the Indian subcontinent, that groups the decimals by three up to one thousand, and by two beyond. This notation comes from the Vedic Numeration System. The KiLiKi large numbers are:
    • tamathO: 10,000 (ten thousand, or 104);
    • taalO: 1,00,000 (one hundred thousand / one lakh, or 105);
    • taamilO: 10,00,000 (one million, or 106);
    • taarO: 1,00,00,000 (ten million / one crore, or 107);
    • taasilO: 10,00,00,000 (one hundred million / ten crore, or 108);
    • taabilO: 1,00,00,00,000 (one billion, or 109);
    • taavilO: 10,00,00,00,000 (ten billion, or 1010);
    • taafilO: 1,00,00,00,00,000 (one hundred billion, or 1011);
    • taatrilO: 10,00,00,00,00,000 (one trillion, or 1012);

Write a number in full in KiLiKi

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in KiLiKi. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Source

Other artistic languages

Atlantean, Atrian, Ayeri, Azazilúŝ, Barsoomian, Belter Creole, Dai, Dovahzul, D’ni, Elder Speech, Giak, Hylian, Illitan, Ithkuil, Itláni, Kēlen, Kiitra, KiLiKi, Láadan, Na’vi, Shiväisith, Trigedasleng, Va Ehenív, Verdurian, and Wardwesân.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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