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Counting in Verdurian

Language overview

Forty-two in Verdurian The Verdurian language (soa Sfahe) is a constructed language designed by Mark Rosenfelder in 1995. Spoken in the fictional nation of Verduria, on the planet Almea, it borrows words and grammar from various languages of Europe, including German, French, Latin and Russian. Verdurian has a Subject-Verb-Object word order, two genders, two numbers, four cases (nominative, genitive, accusative and dative), and four tenses (present, past, past anterior and future).

Verdurian numbers list

  • 1 – an
  • 2 – ďun
  • 3 – ďin
  • 4 – par
  • 5 – pan
  • 6 – sués
  • 7 – hep
  • 8 – žoc
  • 9 – nev
  • 10 – dec
  • 11 – dežán
  • 12 – decďún
  • 13 – decďín
  • 14 – decpár
  • 15 – decpán
  • 16 – decsués
  • 17 – dechép
  • 18 – dežóc
  • 19 – desnév
  • 20 – dvadec
  • 30 – tvedec
  • 40 – čedec
  • 50 – padec
  • 60 – suedec
  • 70 – ëdec
  • 80 – žodec
  • 90 – nëdec
  • 100 – šatem
  • 1,000 – mil

Verdurian numerals

0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6.
6
7.
7
8
8
9
9

Verdurian numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words, namely niš [0], an [1], ďun [2], ďin [3], par [4], pan [5], sués [6], hep [7], žoc [8], and nev [9].
  • Tens are formed prefixing the word for ten (dec) by the combined form of its multiplier digit, except for ten itself. These combined forms are: dva- [2], tve- [3], če- [4], pa- [5], sue- [6], ë- [7], žo- [8], and në- [9]. Thus, we can form the following tens: dec [10], dvadec [20], tvedec [30], čedec [40], padec [50], suedec [60], ëdec [70], žodec [80], and nëdec [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the ten, directly followed with the unit, with no space (e.g.: dežán [11], tvedecpán [35]). Some phonetic changes occur, like c+a=ža and c+ž=ž, and the last vowel is accented (-an gives -án).
  • Hundreds are formed starting with the multiplier combined form (its last vowel gains an acute accent in the process), directly followed by the word for hundred (šatem), with no space, except for one hundred: šatem [100], dvášatem [200], tvéšatem [300], čéšatem [400], pášatem [500], suéšatem [600], ëšatem [700], žóšatem [800], and nëšatem [900].
  • Higher scale numbers are formed starting with the multiplier, then the scale word, separated with a space. Those scale numbers are: mil [thousand, 103], leh [hundred of thousand, 105], perun [million, 106], ftoron [billion, 109], and tveron [trillion, 1012].

Write a number in full in Verdurian

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Verdurian. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Source

Other artistic languages

Atlantean, Atrian, Ayeri, Azazilúŝ, Barsoomian, Belter Creole, Dai, Dovahzul, D’ni, Elder Speech, Giak, Hylian, Illitan, Ithkuil, Itláni, Kēlen, Kiitra, KiLiKi, Láadan, Na’vi, Shiväisith, Trigedasleng, Va Ehenív, Verdurian, and Wardwesân.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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