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Counting in Tüchte

Language overview

Forty-two in Tüchte Tüchte (tüxtə) is a naturalist constructed language invented by the Alsatian ideolinguist Alexis Huchelmann for his master thesis of April 2018, entitled Constructed languages: Delimitation, history and typology followed by an illustration of the process of creation of a naturalist language named “tüchte”. It serves as an illustration of the process of creating a fictional language. It is a minority language spoken in the Hohwald region of the Alsatian Vosges. Tüchte contains a large number of borrowings from French and the surrounding Alsatian dialect, without being related to them. In fact, it is a linguistic isolate with no known relationships.

Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 9,999 in Tüchte. Please contact me if you can help me counting up from that limit.

Tüchte numbers list

  • 1 – üf
  • 2 – bets
  • 3 – kā
  • 4 – paš
  • 5 – müf
  • 6 – viks
  • 7 – sī
  • 8 – ats
  • 9 – derv
  • 10 – lā
  • 11 – üvla
  • 12 – betsla
  • 13 – karda
  • 14 – pašla
  • 15 – müvla
  • 16 – viksla
  • 17 – karšebis
  • 18 – betsebis
  • 19 – üsebis
  • 20 – bis
  • 30 – dritsik
  • 40 – firtsik
  • 50 – fentsik
  • 60 – saxtsik
  • 70 – sevitsik
  • 80 – oxtsik
  • 90 – nintsik
  • 100 – hondar
  • 1,000 – füsu

Tüchte numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words: nul [0], üf [1], bets [2], [3], paš [4], müf [5], viks [6], [7], ats [8], and derv [9].
  • Ten and twenty are rendered by specific words. Beyond, they are borrowed from Alsatian: [10], bis [20], dritsik [30], firtsik [40], fentsik [50], saxtsik [60], sevitsik [70], oxtsik [80], and nintsik [90].
  • Numbers from eleven to sixteen are formed starting with the unit, directly followed by the word for ten (), without accent, except for thirteen: üvla [11], betsla [12], karda [13], pašla [14], müvla [15], and viksla [16]. From seventeen to nineteen, the numbers are formed subtracting the upper ten, here twenty (bis): karšebis [17] (20-3), betsebis [18] (20-2), and üsebis [19] (20-1).
  • Compound numbers over twenty with the unit one to six are formed starting with the unit, followed by the ten linked by l(e), without space (e.g.: bizlemüf [25], firtsiklats [38], saxtsikleka [63]).
  • The word for hundred is hondat [100], borrowed from Alsatian, but can also be said üvakam, which has the additional meaning of “innumerable”.
  • The word for thousand is füsu [1,000].

Write a number in full in Tüchte

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Tüchte. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Source

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As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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