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Counting in Wóxtjanato

Language overview

Forty-two in Wóxtjanato Wóxtjanato is a constructed language designed by Jessie Sams for her New Earth conworld. In that world, a new moon arrived around Earth and changed its evolution. Wóxtjanato is the language of the Wóxtjana people, settled in Old Earth’s western Europe. While Wóxtjanato is not related to any current world languages, it sounds vaguely Indo-European. Stress typically begins on the root of a word, and is marked with an acute accent. Wóxtjanato is an agglutinating language, with a Verb Subject Object structure.

Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 100 in Wóxtjanato. Please contact me if you can help me counting up from that limit.

Wóxtjanato numbers list

  • 1 – ɛ́t
  • 2 – káʦ
  • 3 – áve
  • 4 – kwén
  • 5 – dó
  • 6 – zúli
  • 7 – tjɛ́b
  • 8 – vína
  • 9 – síjo
  • 10 – níkot
  • 11 – níɛt
  • 12 – níka
  • 13 – nía
  • 14 – níkwe
  • 15 – nído
  • 16 – nízu
  • 17 – nítjɛ
  • 18 – nívi
  • 19 – nísi
  • 20 – kániko
  • 30 – ániko
  • 40 – kwéniko
  • 50 – dóniko
  • 60 – zúniko
  • 70 – tjɛ́niko
  • 80 – víniko
  • 90 – síniko
  • 100 – níniko

Wóxtjanato numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words, namely ému [0], ɛ́t [1], káʦ [2], áve [3], kwén [4], [5], zúli [6], tjɛ́b [7], vína [8], and síjo [9].
  • Tens are formed starting with the root of the multiplier digit, directly followed with a form of the word for ten (-niko), with no space, except for ten itself: níkot [10], kániko [20], ániko [30], kwéniko [40], dóniko [50], zúniko [60], tjɛ́niko [70], víniko [80], and síniko [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the root of the ten (without its final -ko), directly followed with the unstressed unit root, with no space (e.g.: nízu [16], zúnikwe [64]).
  • The word for hundred is níniko [100], literally ten tens.

Write a number in full in Wóxtjanato

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Wóxtjanato. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

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