Share:  

Counting in Nìmpyèshiu

Language overview

Forty-two in Nìmpyèshiu Nìmpyèshiu is an artistic language (an artlang) designed by the conlanger Stephen Escher from United Kingdom, who can create your conlang. It was spoken by the ancient Nìmpyèràn people on the world of Sha̤nhaa. Nìmpyèshiu is an analytic language with a basic VSO (verb–subject–object) word order.

Nìmpyèshiu numbers list

  • 116 – ji
  • 216 – jè
  • 316 – sa̤m
  • 416 – shì
  • 516 – rá
  • 616 – lìun
  • 716 – jii
  • 816 – pa̤n
  • 916 – jìu
  • A16 – shrì
  • B16 – lè
  • C16 – dù
  • D16 – tyì
  • E16 – cha
  • F16 – ka
  • 1016 – he̤
  • 2016 – jèhe̤
  • 3016 – sa̤mhe̤
  • 4016 – shìhe̤
  • 5016 – ráhe̤
  • 6016 – lìunhe̤
  • 7016 – jiihe̤
  • 8016 – pa̤nhe̤
  • 9016 – jìuhe̤
  • A016 – shrìhe̤
  • B016 – lèhe̤
  • C016 – dùhe̤
  • D016 – tyìhe̤
  • E016 – chahe̤
  • F016 – kahe̤
  • 10016 – paa

The hexadecimal system (base 16)

Nìmpyèshiu numbers follow a hexadecimal numeral system (base 16, or hex). To better understand this numeral system, let’s start with a more familiar one: the decimal system. In the decimal system (or base-10), we have ten digits, from zero to nine. When we add 1 (one) to 9 (nine), we get 10 (ten), or the unit 1 (one) followed by 0 (zero). This system is positional (the digits represent the units, and their rank the matching power of ten). Thus, 178 decomposes in 100 + 70 + 8 = 1*102 + 7 *101 + 8 *100. This system is also known as a positional decimal numeral system.
Base-16 digits are represented by digits from 0 to 9, and letters from A to F. Its first ten is sixteen in decimal (1610 = 1016), the base being written in subscript. The decomposition of a hexadecimal number (in a positional system) is the same as the one of a decimal number, only the base changes: (178)16 = 1*162 + 7 *161 + 8 *160. If we carry it out, we get the matching decimal number, here 376.

Nìmpyèshiu numerals

Numerals are based on an old tally system which clusters marks into groups of four. The final three marks in the character for four were simplified into a single curved stroke. Characters for five to sixteen consist of a phonetic representing the previous multiple of four, plus the numerals one to four on the right.

1
116
2
216
3.
316
4
416
5
516
6
616
7
716
8
816
9
916
10
1016
11
1116
12
1216
13
1316
14
1416
15
1516
16
1616

Nìmpyèshiu numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Nìmpyèshiu digits from zero to fifteen are: lìam [0], ji [1], [2], sa̤m [3], shì [4], [5], lìun [6], jii [7], pa̤n [8], jìu [9], shrì [A16/1010], [B16/1110], [C16/1210], tyì [D16/1310], cha [E16/1410], and ka [F16/1510].
  • Tens are formed by suffixing the multiplier digit by the word for ten (he̤), except for ten itself: he̤ [1016/1610], jèhe̤ [2016/3210], sa̤mhe̤ [3016/4810], shìhe̤ [4016/6410], ráhe̤ [5016/8010], lìunhe̤ [6016/9610], jiihe̤ [7016/11210], pa̤nhe̤ [8016/12810], jìuhe̤ [9016/14410], shrìhe̤ [A016/16010], lèhe̤ [B016/17610], dùhe̤ [C016/18010], tyìhe̤ [D016/20810], chahe̤ [E016/22410], and kahe̤ [F016/24010].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the hexadecimal ten, directly followed by the unit with no space (e.g.: pa̤nhe̤sa̤m [8316/13110], chahe̤ka [EF16/23910])
  • Hundreds are formed by suffixing the multiplier digit with the word for hundred (paa), except for one hundred: paa [10016/25610], jèpaa [20016/51210], sa̤mpaa [30016/76810], shìpaa [40016/1,02410], rápaa [50016/1,28010], lìumpaa [60016/1,53610], jiipaa [70016/1,79210], pa̤mpaa [80016/2,04810], paa [90016/2,30410], shrìpaa [A0016/2,56010], lèpaa [B0016/2,81610], dùpaa [C0016/3,07210], tyìpaa [D0016/3,32810], chapaa [E0016/3,58410], and kapaa [F0016/3,84010].
  • Thousands are formed by suffixing the multiplier digit with the word for thousand (), except for one thousand: [1,00016/4,09610], jèbá [2,00016/8,19210], sa̤mbá [3,00016/12,28810], shìbá [4,00016/16,38410], rábá [5,00016/20,48010], lìumbá [6,00016/24,57610], jiibá [7,00016/28,67210], pa̤mbá [8,00016/32,76810], bá [9,00016/36,86410], shrìbá [A,00016/40,96010], lèbá [B,00016/45,05610], dùbá [C,00016/49,15210], tyìbá [D,00016/53,24810], chabá [E,00016/57,34410], and kabá [F,00016/61,44010].
  • Some phonological rules for compounds apply, especially an ending /n/ becomes a /m/ in front of a /p/ or a /b/. Thus, 60016 is lìumpaa and not lìunpaa, and 6,00016 is lìumbá and not lìunbá. Likewise, 80016 is pa̤mpaa and not pa̤npaa, and 8,00016 is pa̤mbá and not pa̤nbá.
  • Big compound numbers are formed grouping the digits by three: jèpaa sa̤mhe̤pa̤n [23816/56810], bá ji [1,00116/4,09710], sa̤mbá dùhe̤ [3,0C016/12,48010]…

Source

Other artistic languages

Aczu Śavnecze, Atlantean, Atrian, Ayeri, Azazilúŝ, Barsoomian, Belter Creole, Brooding, Dai, Dovahzul, D’ni, Elder Speech, Engála, Giak, Grayis, Hiuʦɑθ, Hylian, Illitan, Ithkuil, Itláni, Kēlen, Kiitra, KiLiKi, Láadan, Na’vi, Nìmpyèshiu, Shiväisith, Siinyamda, Toki Pona, Tpaalha, Trigedasleng, Tüchte, Va Ehenív, Verdurian, and Wardwesân.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

This site uses cookies for statistical and advertising purposes. By using this site, you accept the use of cookies.