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Counting in Gottscheerish

Language overview

Forty-two in Gottscheerish Gottscheerish (Göttscheabarisch), also known as Granish or Granisch, is an Upper German dialect that belongs to the West Germanic languages, in the Indo-European languages family. Spoken by the Gottscheers in the enclave of Gottschee, Slovenia, before 1941, it counts nowadays only a few speakers.

Gottscheerish numbers list

  • 1 – uains
  • 2 – tsboai
  • 3 – drai
  • 4 – viər
  • 5 – vemf
  • 6 – žekš
  • 7 – žībm
  • 8 – oχt
  • 9 – nain
  • 10 – tsēhŋ
  • 11 – uaindlof
  • 12 – tsbelf
  • 13 – draitsain
  • 14 – viərttsain
  • 15 – vu̇ftsain
  • 16 – žaχtsain
  • 17 – žimtsain
  • 18 – oχtsain
  • 19 – naintsain
  • 20 – tsbȯntsikh
  • 30 – draisikh
  • 40 – viərttsikh
  • 50 – vu̇ftsikh
  • 60 – žaχtsikh
  • 70 – žimtsikh
  • 80 – oχtsikh
  • 90 – naintsikh
  • 100 – hu̇ndərt
  • 1,000 – tau̇žnt
  • one million – uains miliōn

Gottscheerish numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from one to nine are rendered by specific words, namely uains [1] (uian when compound), tsboai [2], drai [3], viər [4], vemf [5] (vemv when compound), žekš [6], žībm [7], oχt [8], and nain [9].
  • Numbers from eleven to nineteen are formed starting with the unit, directly followed with the suffix tsain, a deformation of the word for ten (tsēhŋ), except for eleven, twelve and fifteen, plus some vocalic changes: uaindlof [11], tsbelf [12], draitsain [13], viərttsain [14], vu̇ftsain (or vemftsain) [15], žaχtsain [16], žimtsain [17], oχtsain [18], and naintsain [19].
  • Tens are formed starting with the multiplier digit, with some vocalic changes, directly followed by the suffix sikh, except for ten: tsēhŋ [10], tsbȯntsikh [20], draisikh [30], viərttsikh [40], vu̇ftsikh (or vemftsikh) [50], žaχtsikh [60], žimtsikh [70], oχtsikh [80], and naintsikh [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the unit, then the word in (and) linked with hyphens, and the ten (e.g.: viər-in-tsbȯntsikh [24], oχt-in-žaχtsikh [68]).
  • Hundreds are formed starting with the multiplier digit, directly followed by the word for hundred (hu̇ndərt), except for one hundred itself: hu̇ndərt [100], tsboaihu̇ndərt (or tsbianhu̇ndərt) [200], draihu̇ndərt [300], viərhu̇ndərt [400], vemfhu̇ndərt [500], žekšhu̇ndərt [600], žībmhu̇ndərt [700], oχthu̇ndərt [800], and nainhu̇ndərt [900].
  • Compound hundreds are formed linking the hundred and the unit, or the hundred and the ten, with a hyphen (e.g.: hu̇ndərt-drai [103], hu̇ndərt-uaindlof [111]).
  • Thousands are formed starting with the multiplier digit, directly followed by the word for thousand (tau̇žnt), except for one thousand: tau̇žnt [1,000], tsboaitau̇žnt (or tsbaintau̇žnt) [2,000], draitau̇žnt [3,000], viərtau̇žnt [4,000], vemftau̇žnt [5,000], žekštau̇žnt [6,000], žībmtau̇žnt [7,000], oχttau̇žnt [8,000], and naintau̇žnt [9,000].
  • The word for million is miliōn [1 million].

Write a number in full in Gottscheerish

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Gottscheerish. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

West Germanic languages

Afrikaans, Alsatian, Bavarian, English, German, Gottscheerish, Luxembourgish, North Frisian, Pennsylvania German, Plautdietsch, Saterland Frisian, Swiss German, West Frisian, and Wymysorys.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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