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Counting in Swiss German

Language overview

Forty-two in Swiss German Swiss German (Schwyzerdütsch, Schwizertütsch, Schwizertitsch) is any of the Alemannic dialects spoken in Switzerland, in some Alpine communities in Northern Italy, as well as in Liechtenstein and Austrian Vorarlberg. It belongs to the Indo-European family, and more precisely to the Allemanic subgroup of Germanic. It counts about 6.5 million speakers.

Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 99 in Swiss German. Please contact me if you can help me counting up from that limit.

Swiss German numbers list

  • 1 – eis
  • 2 – zwöi
  • 3 – drü
  • 4 – vier
  • 5 – füf
  • 6 – säch
  • 7 – sibe
  • 8 – acht
  • 9 – nüün
  • 10 – zäh
  • 11 – euf
  • 12 – zwöuf
  • 13 – dryzäh
  • 14 – vierzäh
  • 15 – füfzäh
  • 16 – sächzäh
  • 17 – sibezäh
  • 18 – achtzäh
  • 19 – nüünzäh
  • 20 – zwänzg
  • 30 – dryssg
  • 40 – vierzg
  • 50 – füfzg
  • 60 – sëchzg
  • 70 – sibezg
  • 80 – achzg
  • 90 – nüünzg

Swiss German numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits and numbers from one to twelve are specific words: eis [1], zwöi [2], drü [3], vier [4], füf [5], säch [6], sibe [7], acht [8], nüün [9], zäh [10], euf [11], and zwöuf [12].
  • From thirteen to nineteen, the numbers are formed from the matching digits, adding the word for ten (zäh) at the end: dryzäh [13], vierzäh [14], füfzäh [15], sächzäh [16], sibezäh [17], achtzäh [18], and nüünzäh [19].
  • The tens are formed by adding the suffix -zg at the end of the digits, with the exception of ten: zäh [10], zwänzg [20], dryssg [30], vierzg [40], füfzg [50], sëchzg [60], sibezg [70], achzg [80], and nüünzg [90].
  • From twenty-one to ninety-nine, the tens and units are joined with the word e (and), but the unit is said before the ten (e.g.: füfedryssg [35], zwöiesibezg [72]). When compound, the digits one and seven change slightly (e.g.: einefüfzg [51], sibenenüünzg [97]).

Write a number in full in Swiss German

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Swiss German. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Books

Die Schweizermacher. A Swiss German Tutorial Die Schweizermacher. A Swiss German Tutorial
by , editors Books on Demand GmbH (2003)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Hoi ! et Après… Manuel de Survie en Suisse Allemand Hoi ! et Après… Manuel de Survie en Suisse Allemand
by , editors Bergli Books Ltd (2008)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com, Kindle - Amazon.com Kindle - Amazon.com]

West Germanic languages

Afrikaans, Alsatian, Bavarian, English, German, Luxembourgish, North Frisian, Pennsylvania German, Plautdietsch, Saterland Frisian, Swiss German, West Frisian, and Wymysorys.

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