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Counting in Hunsrik

Language overview

Forty-two in Hunsrik Hunsrik (Hunsrückisch, or Riograndenser Hunsrückisch) is a Moselle Franconian language belonging to the West Germanic branch of the Germanic languages. Derived from the Hunsrückisch dialect of the Hunsrück region of Germany, the language arrived in the South region of Brazil when immigrants settled there, starting in 1824. It has been influenced by other German dialects like East Pomeranian, Swabian, and Austro-Bavarian, and by Portuguese too. Co-official language in three municipalities (Antônio Carlos, Santa Maria do Herval, and São João do Oeste), Hunsrik is spoken in the states of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina and Paraná, but also in the province of Misiones, Argentina, and in the south of Paraguay. Hunsrik counts about 3 million native speakers.

Hunsrik numbers list

  • 1 – enns
  • 2 – zweu
  • 3 – drei
  • 4 – fier
  • 5 – finnef
  • 6 – sechs
  • 7 – sieve
  • 8 – acht
  • 9 – nein
  • 10 – zehn
  • 11 – ellef
  • 12 – zwellef
  • 13 – dreizen
  • 14 – ferzen
  • 15 – fufzen
  • 16 – sechzen
  • 17 – sibzen
  • 18 – achtzen
  • 19 – neinzen
  • 20 – zwanzich
  • 30 – dreisich
  • 40 – ferzich
  • 50 – fufzich
  • 60 – sechzich
  • 70 – sibzich
  • 80 – achtzich
  • 90 – neinzich
  • 100 – hunnerd
  • 1,000 – tausend

Hunsrik numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits and numbers from zero to twelve are rendered by specific words: null [0], enns [1], zweu [2], drei [3], fier [4], finnef [5], sechs [6], sieve [7], acht [8], nein [9], zehn [10], ellef [11], and zwellef [12].
  • From thirteen to nineteen, the numbers are formed from the matching unit digits, adding a form of the word for ten (zen) at the end: dreizen [13], ferzen [14], finnefzen or fufzen [15], sechzen [16], sibzen [17], achtzen [18], and neinzen [19].
  • Tens are formed by adding the suffix zich or sich at the end of the multiplier digit, with the exception of ten and twenty: zehn [10], zwanzich [20], dreisich [30], ferzich [40], finnefzich or fufzich [50], sechzich [60], sibzich [70], achtzich [80], and neinzich [90].
  • From twenty-one to ninety-nine, tens and units are joined with the conjunction un (and) linked with dashes, the unit being placed in first position, before the ten (e.g.: finnef-un-dreisich [35], acht-un-sechzich [68]).
  • Hundreds are formed starting with the multiplier digit, followed by the word for hundred (hunnerd) linked with a dash: (enns-)hunnerd [100], zweu-hunnerd [200], drei-hunnerd [300], fier-hunnerd [400], finnef-hunnerd [500], sechs-hunnerd [600], sieve-hunnerd [700], acht-hunnerd [800], and nein-hunnerd [900].
  • Thousands are formed starting with the multiplier digit, followed by the word for thousand (tausend) linked with a dash: (enns-)tausend [1,000], zweu-tausend [2,000], drei-tausend [3,000], fier-tausend [4,000], finnef-tausend [5,000], sechs-tausend [6,000], sieve-tausend [7,000], acht-tausend [8,000], and nein-tausend [9,000].
  • The word for million is Million [1 million] (plural: Millione).

Write a number in full in Hunsrik

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Hunsrik. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

West Germanic languages

Afrikaans, Alsatian, Bavarian, English, German, Gottscheerish, Hunsrik, Luxembourgish, North Frisian, Pennsylvania German, Plautdietsch, Saterland Frisian, Swiss German, West Frisian, Wymysorys, and Yiddish.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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