Share:  

Counting in Mazahua

Language overview

Forty-two in Mazahua Mazahua (Jñatrjo in Central Mazahua, Jñatjo in Michoacán Mazahua) is an Otomian language that belongs to the Oto-Manguean language family. Spoken by the Mazahua people in the central state of Mexico, the Mazahua language counts about 116,000 speakers. Mazahua is a tonal language with three tones (high, low, and falling), and a very large number of phonemes, about sixty, hence twice more as English for instance, forty-five consonants and fifteen vowels. The Mazahua language counts two varieties: Central Mazahua, which includes the dialects of Atlacomulco-Temascalcingo, San Miguel Tenoxtitlán and Santa María Citendejé-Banos, and Michoacán Mazahua, or Toluca Mazahua.

Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 1,000 in Mazahua. Please contact me if you can help me counting up from that limit.

Mazahua numbers list

  • 1 – d’aja
  • 2 – yeje
  • 3 – jñii
  • 4 – nziyo
  • 5 – ts’ich’a
  • 6 – ñanto
  • 7 – yencho
  • 8 – jñincho
  • 9 – nzincho
  • 10 – dyecha
  • 11 – dyecha d’aja
  • 12 – dyecha yeje
  • 13 – dyecha jñii
  • 14 – dyecha nziyo
  • 15 – dyecha ts’ich’a
  • 16 – dyecha ñanto
  • 17 – dyecha yencho
  • 18 – dyecha jñincho
  • 19 – dyecha nzincho
  • 20 – dyote
  • 30 – jñite
  • 40 – nzite
  • 50 – ts’ite
  • 60 – ñante
  • 70 – yente
  • 80 – jñinte
  • 90 – nzinte
  • 100 – dyete
  • 1,000 – dyedyete

Mazahua numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words: dya kjaa [0], d’aja [1], yeje [2], jñii [3], nziyo [4], ts’ich’a [5], ñanto [6], yencho [7], jñincho [8], and nzincho [9].
  • Tens are formed on their multiplier unit, except for ten and twenty: dyecha [10], dyote [20], jñite [30], nzite [40], ts’ite [50], ñante [60], yente [70], jñinte [80], and nzinte [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the ten, followed by the unit separated with a space (e.g.: ts’ite nziyo [54], jñinte jñii [83]).
  • Hundreds are formed starting with the multiplier unit, followed by the word for hundred (dyete), separated with a space, except for one hundred: dyete [100], yeje dyete [200], jñii dyete [300], nziyo dyete [400], ts’ich’a dyete [500], ñanto dyete [600], yencho dyete [700], jñincho dyete [800], and nzincho dyete [900].
  • The word for thousand is dyedyete [1,000], which means 10 times 100.

Write a number in full in Mazahua

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Mazahua. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Oto-Manguean languages

Aloápam Zapotec, Choapan Zapotec, Copala Triqui, Isthmus Zapotec, Lachixío Zapotec, Mazahua, Rincón Zapotec, Santa Ana Yareni Zapotec, Sierra Otomi, and Tezoatlán Mixtec.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

This site uses cookies for statistical and advertising purposes. By using this site, you accept the use of cookies.