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Counting in Asturian

Language overview

Forty-two in Asturian Asturian (asturianu) is a Romance language of the West Iberian group. Whereas not an official language, it is spoken in the Spanish province of Asturias by about 150,000 people. It is also known as Astur-Leonese or Bable.

Asturian numbers list

  • 1 – un
  • 2 – dos
  • 3 – tres
  • 4 – cuatro
  • 5 – cinco
  • 6 – seis
  • 7 – siete
  • 8 – ocho
  • 9 – nueve
  • 10 – diez
  • 11 – once
  • 12 – doce
  • 13 – trece
  • 14 – catorce
  • 15 – quince
  • 16 – deciséis
  • 17 – decisiete
  • 18 – deciocho
  • 19 – decinueve
  • 20 – venti
  • 30 – trenta
  • 40 – cuaranta
  • 50 – cincuenta
  • 60 – sesenta
  • 70 – setanta
  • 80 – ochenta
  • 90 – noventa
  • 100 – cien
  • 1,000 – mil
  • one million – un millón

Asturian numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits and numbers from zero to fifteen are specific words, namely ceru [0], un [1] (una in its feminine form), dos [2], tres [3], cuatro [4], cinco [5], seis [6], siete [7], ocho [8], nueve [9], diez [10], once [11], doce [12], trece [13], catorce [14], quince [15]. Sixteen to twenty-nine are regular numbers, i.e. named after the ten (or the twenty) and the digit. Diez y seis [10 and 6] is phonetically shortened with an apocope as deciséis. The same applies up to twenty-nine: decisiete [10 and 7], deciocho [10 and 8]… ventinueve [20 and 9].
  • The tens have specific names based on the multiplier digits roots except for ten and twenty: diez [10], venti [20], trenta [30], cuarenta [40], cincuenta [50], sesenta [60], setenta [70], ochenta [80] and noventa [90].
  • Tens and units are linked with y (and), as in trenta y un [31].
  • Hundreds are formed by removing the space between the multiplier and the hundred word: cien [100] (plural cientos), but doscientos [200], trescientos [300], cuatrocientos [400], quinientos [500], seiscientos [600], setecientos [700], ochocientos [800], and novecientos [900].

Write a number in full in Asturian

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Asturian. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Romance languages

Asturian, Catalan, Corsican, Eonavian, French, Friulian, Galician, Gallo, Italian, Jèrriais, Ladin, Latin, Lombard (Milanese), Occitan, Picard, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Romansh, Sardinian, Spanish, and Venetian.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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