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Counting in Occitan

Language overview

Forty-two in Occitan Occitan, also known as Lenga d’òc, is a Romance language of the Gallo-Romance group spoken in southern France, Italy’s Occitan Valleys and Guardia Piemontese, Monaco, and Spain’s Val d’Aran by about 2 million speakers. It counts many dialects (including the six most important: Auvergnat, Gascon, Languedocien, Limousin, Provençal, and Vivaro-Alpine), all of them endangered, either severely or definitely. The dialect described here is the Languedocien.

Occitan numbers list

  • 1 – un
  • 2 – dos
  • 3 – tres
  • 4 – quatre
  • 5 – cinc
  • 6 – sièis
  • 7 – sèt
  • 8 – uèch
  • 9 – nòu
  • 10 – dètz
  • 11 – onze
  • 12 – dotze
  • 13 – tretze
  • 14 – catòrze
  • 15 – quinze
  • 16 – setze
  • 17 – dètz-e-sèt
  • 18 – dètz-e-uèch
  • 19 – dètz-e-nòu
  • 20 – vint
  • 30 – trenta
  • 40 – quaranta
  • 50 – cinquanta
  • 60 – seissanta
  • 70 – setanta
  • 80 – ochanta
  • 90 – nonanta
  • 100 – cent
  • 1,000 – mila
  • one million – un milion
  • one billion – un miliard

Occitan numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits and numbers from zero to sixteen are specific words, namely zèro [0], un [1] (una in its feminine form), dos [2] (doás in its feminine form), tres [3], quatre [4], cinc [5], sièis [6], sèt [7], uèch [8], nòu [9], dètz [10], onze [11], dotze [12], tretze [13], catòrze [14], quinze [15], and setze [16]. Seventeen to twenty-nine are regular numbers, i.e. named after the ten (or the twenty) and the digit, linked with a dashed e (and): dètz-e-sèt [10 and 7], dètz-e-uèch [10 and 8], dètz-e-nòu [10 and 9]… vint-e-nòu [20 and 9].
  • The tens have specific names based on the multiplier digits roots except for ten and twenty: dètz [10], vint [20], trenta [30], quaranta [40], cinquanta [50], seissanta [60], setanta [70], ochenta [80], and nonanta [90].
  • Compound numbers above thirty are formed by stating the ten, than the digit separated with a space (e.g.: cinquanta sèt [57], nonanta nòu [99]).
  • Hundreds are formed by stating the multiplier digit before the word for hundred (cent, cents in plural), except for one hundred itself: cent [100], dos cents [200], tres cents [300], quatre cents [400], cinc cents [500], sièis cents [600], sèt cents [700], uèch cents [800], and nòu cents [900].
  • Thousands are formed by stating the multiplier digit before the word for hundred (mila), except for one thousand itself: mila [1,000], dos mila [2,000], tres mila [3,000], quatre mila [4,000], cinc mila [5,000], sièis mila [6,000], sèt mila [7,000], uèch mila [8,000], and nòu mila [9,000].
  • The word for million (106) is milion (plural milions), and the word for billion (109) is miliard (plural miliards).

Write a number in full in Occitan

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Occitan. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Books

L’Occitan Sans Peine L’Occitan Sans Peine
by , editors Assimil (2003)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Source

Romance languages

Asturian, Catalan, Corsican, Eonavian, French, Friulian, Galician, Gallo, Italian, Jèrriais, Ladin, Latin, Lombard (Milanese), Occitan, Picard, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Proto-Indo-European, Romansh, Sardinian, Spanish, and Venetian.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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