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Counting in Friulian

Language overview

Forty-two in Friulian Friulian (furlan), also known as Eastern Ladin, is a romance language from the Indo-European family. Spoken in the Friuli region of northeastern Italy, it counts about 800,000 speakers.

Friulian numbers list

  • 1 – un
  • 2 – doi
  • 3 – trê
  • 4 – cuatri
  • 5 – cinc
  • 6 – sîs
  • 7 – siet
  • 8 – vot
  • 9 – nûf
  • 10 – dîs
  • 11 – undis
  • 12 – dodis
  • 13 – tredis
  • 14 – cutuardis
  • 15 – cuindis
  • 16 – sedis
  • 17 – disesiet
  • 18 – disevot
  • 19 – disenûf
  • 20 – vincj
  • 30 – trente
  • 40 – cuarante
  • 50 – cincuante
  • 60 – sessante
  • 70 – setante
  • 80 – otante
  • 90 – novante
  • 100 – cent
  • 1,000 – mil
  • one million – un milion
  • one billion – un miliart

Friulian numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Numbers from zero to ten are specific words, namely zero [0], un (feminine une) [1], doi (feminine dôs) [2], trê [3], cuatri [4], cinc [5], sîs [6], siet [7], vot [8], nûf [9], and dîs [10].
  • From eleven to sixteen, numbers are formed from the root of the digit followed by ten: undis [11], dodis [12], tredis [13], cutuardis [14], cuindis [15], and sedis [16]. From seventeen to nineteen, the order is reversed, as the unit is put directly after the ten: disesiet [17], disevot [18], and disenûf [19].
  • The tens have specific names based on the matching multiplier digit root, except for ten and twenty: dîs [10], vincj [20], trente [30], cuarante [40], cincuante [50], sessante [60], setante [70], otante [80], and novante [90].
  • Compound numbers above twenty are formed by juxtaposing the ten, the coordinator e (and), and the unit with no space, causing an apocope of the last vowel of the ten name (e.g.: vincjeun [21], trentedoi [32], cuarantevot [48]).
  • The hundreds are formed by prefixing the word for hundred (cent) with the multiplier digit without space, except for one hundred, two hundred and three hundred: cent [100], dusinte [200], tresinte [300], cuatricent [400], cinccent [500], sîscent [600]…
  • Hundreds, tens and units are linked together with the coordinating conjunction e separated with spaces (e.g.: cent e nûf [109], dusinte e trente [230], nûfcent e novantenûf [999]).
  • Thousands are formed by setting the multiplier digit before the word for thousand (mil) separated with a space, except for one thousand: mil [1,000], doi mil [2,000], trê mil [3,000], cuatri mil [4,000]… Thousands are linked with lower scales with the word e unless the hundred is followed by a ten or a unit (e.g.: mil e un [1,001], mil e cent [1,100], mil cent e dîs [1,110]).
  • One million (106) is un milion (plural milions), and one US billion (109) is un miliart (plural miliarts).

Write a number in full in Friulian

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Friulian. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Romance languages

Asturian, Catalan, Corsican, Eonavian, French, Friulian, Galician, Gallo, Italian, Jèrriais, Ladin, Latin, Lombard (Milanese), Occitan, Picard, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Proto-Indo-European, Romansh, Sardinian, Spanish, and Venetian.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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