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Counting in Manx Gaelic

Language overview

Forty-two in Manx Gaelic The Manx language (Gaelg, Gailck), also known as Manx Gaelic, belongs to the Celtic languages of the Indo-European languages family. It was spoken as a first language by the Manx people on the Isle of Man until 1974 with the passing of its last native speaker. After some language revival efforts, it can count with about 1,800 second language speakers, and fifty with Manx as their mother tongue.

Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 1,000 in Manx Gaelic. Please contact me if you can help me counting up from that limit.

Manx Gaelic numbers list

  • 1 – nane
  • 2 – jees
  • 3 – tree
  • 4 – kiare
  • 5 – queig
  • 6 – shey
  • 7 – shiaght
  • 8 – hoght
  • 9 – nuy
  • 10 – deich
  • 11 – nane-jeig
  • 12 – daa-yeig
  • 13 – tree-jeig
  • 14 – kiare-jeig
  • 15 – queig-jeig
  • 16 – shey-jeig
  • 17 – shiaght-jeig
  • 18 – hoght-jeig
  • 19 – nuy-jeig
  • 20 – feed
  • 30 – jeih as feed
  • 40 – daeed
  • 50 – jeih as daeed
  • 60 – tree feed
  • 70 – tree feed as jeih
  • 80 – kiare feed
  • 90 – kiare feed as jeih
  • 100 – keead
  • 1,000 – milley

Manx Gaelic numbering rules

  • Digits from zero to nine have specific names: neunhee [0], nane [1], jees or daa when compound [2], tree [3], kiare [4], queig [5], shey [6], shiaght [7], hoght [8], and nuy [9].
  • The tens are following a vigesimal system (based on twenty): jeih [10], feed [20], jeih as feed (10+20) [30], daeed (2*20) [40], jeih as daeed (10+2*20) [50], tree feed (3*20) [60], tree feed as jeih (3*20+10) [70], kiare feed (4*20) [80], and kiare feed as jeih (4*20+10) [90]. We can note that addition and multiplication are not kept in the same order in the ten creation: 30 and 50 use the 10+y*20 pattern, while 70 and 90 use the y*20+10 pattern.
  • A decimal system also exists, using the following tens: jeih [10], feed [20], treead [30], daeed [40], queigad [50], sheyad [60], shiagtad [70], hoghtad [80], and nuyad [90].
  • Teens are formed by starting with the unit, followed by a hyphen and the word for ten (jeig, or yeig for twelve): nane-jeig [11], daa-yeig [12], tree-jeig [13], kiare-jeig [14], queig-jeig [15], shey-jeig [16], shiaght-jeig [17], hoght-jeig [18], and nuy-jeig [19].
  • Compound numbers from twenty-one to fifty-nine are formed starting with the unit (or the teen), followed by the particle as, then the ten (e.g.: jees as feed [22], kiare-jeig as daeed [54]).
  • From sixty-one to ninety-nine, the order is reversed, as compound numbers are formed starting with the ten, followed by the particle as, then the unit (or the teen) (e.g.: tree feed as queig [65], kiare feed as shiaght-jeig [97]).
  • Hundreds are formed by stating the multiplier digit before the word for hundred (cheed), linked with a hyphen, except for one hundred: keead [100], daa-cheed [200], tree-cheed [300], kiare-cheed [400], queig-cheed [500], shey-cheed [600], shiaght-cheed [700], hoght-cheed [800], and nuy-cheed [900].
  • The word for thousand is milley.

Write a number in full in Manx Gaelic

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Celtic languages

Breton, Cornish, Irish, Manx Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic, and Welsh.

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