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Counting in Breton

Language overview

Forty-two in Breton The Breton language (Brezhoneg) belongs to the Celtic languages of the Indo-European languages family. Spoken in the French region of Brittany, it is considered as a regional language, and counts about 210,000 speakers.

Breton numbers list

  • 1 – unan
  • 2 – daou
  • 3 – tri
  • 4 – pevar
  • 5 – pemp
  • 6 – c’hwec’h
  • 7 – seizh
  • 8 – eizh
  • 9 – nav
  • 10 – dek
  • 11 – unnek
  • 12 – daouzek
  • 13 – trizek
  • 14 – pevarzek
  • 15 – pemzek
  • 16 – c’hwezek
  • 17 – seitek
  • 18 – triwec’h
  • 19 – naontek
  • 20 – ugent
  • 30 – tregont
  • 40 – daou-ugent
  • 50 – hanter-kant
  • 60 – tri-ugent
  • 70 – dek ha tri-ugent
  • 80 – pevar-ugent
  • 90 – dek ha pevar-ugent
  • 100 – kant
  • 1,000 – mil

Breton numbering rules

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words: mann [0], unan [1], daou / div (masculine/feminine) [2], tri / teir (masculine/feminine) [3], pevar / peder (masculine/feminine) [4], pemp [5], c’hwec’h [6], seizh [7], eizh [8], and nav [9].
  • The tens are following a vigesimal system (based on twenty): dek [10], ugent [20], tregont [30], daou-ugent (2*20) [40], hanter-kant (half-hundred) [50], tri-ugent (3*20) [60], dek ha tri-ugent (10+3*20) [70], pevar-ugent (4*20) [80], and dek ha pevar-ugent (10+4*20) [90].
  • Teens are formed by starting with the unit, directly followed by the root of the word for ten (dek): unnek [11], daouzek [12], trizek [13], pevarzek [14], pemzek [15], c’hwezek [16], seitek [17], triwec’h (litterally, three six) [18], and naontek [19].
  • Compound numbers from twenty-one to twenty-nine are formed starting with the unit, followed by the particle warn (over), then the word for twenty (e.g.: unan warn ugent [21], c’hwec’h warn ugent [26]).
  • Compound numbers from thirty-one to ninety-nine are formed starting with the unit or the teen, followed by the particle ha (and), then the ten (e.g.: tri ha tregont [33], seizh ha hanter-kant [57], pevarzek ha tri-ugent [74]).
  • Hundreds are formed by stating the multiplier digit before the word for hundred (kant or c’hant), except for one hundred: kant [100], daou c’hant [200], tri c’hant [300], pevar c’hant [400], pemp kant [500], c’hwec’h kant [600], seizh kant [700], eizh kant [800], and nav c’hant [900].
  • Thousands are formed by stating the multiplier digit before the word for thousand (mil or vil), except for one thousand: mil [1,000], daou vil [2,000], tri mil [3,000], pevar mil [4,000], pemp mil [5,000], c’hwec’h mil [6,000], seizh mil [7,000], eizh mil [8,000], and nav mil [9,000].
  • One million is ur million, and one billion, ur milliard.

Write a number in full in Breton

Enter a number and get it written in full in Breton.

Books

Breton GrammarBreton Grammar
by , editors Evertype (2011)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Colloquial BretonColloquial Breton
by , editors Routledge (2003)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Le breton - Guide de conversation pour les nulsLe breton - Guide de conversation pour les nuls
by , editors First (2016)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com, Kindle - Amazon.com Kindle - Amazon.com]

Le Breton - BrezhonegLe Breton - Brezhoneg
by , editors Assimil (2016)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Petite grammaire du breton modernePetite grammaire du breton moderne
by , editors Mouladurioù Hor Yezh (1999)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Celtic languages

Breton, Cornish, Irish, Manx Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic, and Welsh.

Other supported languages

Languages classified by languages families
As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the following select box, or from the full list of supported languages.

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