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Counting in Dogrib

Language overview

Forty-two in Dogrib Dogrib (Tłı̨chǫ) is a Northern Athabaskan language from the Na-Dené language family. Spoken by the Tłı̨chǫ people, or Dogrib people, of the Canadian Northwest Territories, it counts about 1,700 speakers.

Dogrib numbers list

  • 1 – ı̨łè
  • 2 – nàke
  • 3 – taı
  • 4 – dı̨
  • 5 – sı̨làı
  • 6 – ek’ètaı
  • 7 – łǫ̀hdı̨
  • 8 – ek’èdı̨
  • 9 – łǫǫ̀tǫ
  • 10 – hoònǫ
  • 11 – hoònǫ daatsʼq ı̨łè
  • 12 – hoònǫ daatsʼq nàke
  • 13 – hoònǫ daatsʼq taı
  • 14 – hoònǫ daatsʼq dı̨
  • 15 – hoònǫ daatsʼq sı̨làı
  • 16 – hoònǫ daatsʼq ek’ètaı
  • 17 – hoònǫ daatsʼq łǫ̀hdı̨
  • 18 – hoònǫ daatsʼq ek’èdı̨
  • 19 – hoònǫ daatsʼq łǫǫ̀tǫ
  • 20 – naènǫ
  • 30 – taènǫ
  • 40 – dı̨ènǫ
  • 50 – sı̨làènǫ
  • 60 – ek’ètaènǫ
  • 70 – łǫ̀hdı̨ènǫ
  • 80 – ek’èdı̨ènǫ
  • 90 – łǫǫ̀tǫ
  • 100 – ı̨łèlakw’eènǫ
  • 1,000 – ı̨łè lemı̀
  • one million – ı̨łè lemı̀yǫǫ̀

Dogrib numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words, namely ets’aèhmǫ̀ą [0], ı̨łè [1], nàke [2], taı [3], dı̨ [4], sı̨làı [5], ek’ètaı [6], łǫ̀hdı̨ [7], ek’èdı̨ [8], and łǫǫ̀tǫ [9].
  • Tens are formed suffixing the multiplier digit root with ènǫ, except for ten: hoònǫ [10], naènǫ [20], taènǫ [30], dı̨ènǫ [40], sı̨làènǫ [50], ek’ètaènǫ [60], łǫ̀hdı̨ènǫ [70], ek’èdı̨ènǫ [80], and łǫǫ̀tǫ [90].
  • Compounds numbers are formed starting with the ten, then the conjunction daatsʼq̨̀, and the digit (e.g.: hoònǫ daatsʼq sı̨làı [15], ek’èdı̨ènǫ daatsʼq taı [83]).
  • One hundred is ı̨łèlakw’eènǫ [100].
  • Thousands are formed starting with the multiplier digit, followed by the word for thousand (lemı̀), separated with a space: ı̨łè lemı̀ [1,000], nàke lemı̀ [2,000], taı lemı̀ [3,000], dı̨ lemı̀ [4,000], sı̨làı lemı̀ [5,000], ek’ètaı lemı̀ [6,000], łǫ̀hdı̨ lemı̀ [7,000], ek’èdı̨ lemı̀ [8,000], and łǫǫ̀tǫ lemı̀ [9,000].
  • The word for million is lemı̀yǫǫ̀ or lemı̀ızhǫǫ̀. Millions are regularly formed like thousands: ı̨łè lemı̀yǫǫ̀ [1 million], nàke lemı̀yǫǫ̀ [2 millions]…

Write a number in full in Dogrib

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Dogrib. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Books

The Dogrib dictionary The Dogrib dictionary
by , editors CreateSpace (2017)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Walking the Land, Feeding the Fire: Knowledge and Stewardship Among the Tłı̨chǫ Dene Walking the Land, Feeding the Fire: Knowledge and Stewardship Among the Tłı̨chǫ Dene
by , editors University of Arizona Press (2012)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

The Legend of the Caribou Boy / Ekwò Dǫzhìa Wegondı The Legend of the Caribou Boy / Ekwò Dǫzhìa Wegondı
by , editors Theytus Books (2009)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

The Old Man with the Otter Medicine / Eneèko Nàmbe Įk’ǫǫ K’eèzhǫ The Old Man with the Otter Medicine / Eneèko Nàmbe Įk’ǫǫ K’eèzhǫ
by , editors Theytus Books (2008)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Sources

Athapaskan languages

Carrier, Dogrib, Hupa, Navajo, Siletz dee-ni, Tlingit, and Tolowa.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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