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Counting in Siletz dee-ni

Language overview

Forty-two in Siletz dee-ni The Siletz Dee-ni language is a form of the Tolowa language (Taa-Laa-Wa), a Pacific Coast Athapaskan language from the Na-Dené language family. It is historically spoken by the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians on the Siletz Indian Reservation in Oregon. Officially extinct, it is being revitalized from an excerpt of about 14,000 gathered words taught in middle school programs.

Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 100 in Siletz dee-ni. Please contact me if you can help me counting up from that limit.

Siletz dee-ni numbers list

  • 1 – lha’
  • 2 – naa-xe
  • 3 – taa-xe
  • 4 – dvn-chi’
  • 5 – srwee-la’
  • 6 – k’wee-staa-ni
  • 7 – srch’ee-t’e
  • 8 – laa-nii-srvt-naa-ta
  • 9 – lha’-duy
  • 10 – nee-san
  • 11 – nee-san-lha’-ch’aa-ta
  • 12 – nee-san-naa-xe-ch’aa-ta
  • 13 – nee-san-taa-xe-ch’aa-ta
  • 14 – nee-san-dvn-chi’-ch’aa-ta
  • 15 – nee-san-srwee-la’-ch’aa-ta
  • 16 – nee-san-k’wee-staa-ni-ch’aa-ta
  • 17 – nee-san-srch’ee-t’ee-ch’aa-ta
  • 18 – nee-san-laa-nii-srvt-naa-ta-ch’aa-ta
  • 19 – nee-san-lha’-duy-ch’aa-ta
  • 20 – naa-tvn-nee-san
  • 30 – taa-tvn-nee-san
  • 40 – dinch-tvn-nee-san
  • 50 – srwee-la’-tvn-nee-san
  • 60 – k’wee-staa-nii-tvn-nee-san
  • 70 – srch’ee-t’ee-tvn-nee-san
  • 80 – laa-nii-srvt-naa-taa-tvn-nee-san
  • 90 – lha’-duy-tvn-nee-san
  • 100 – lha’-chvn
  • 1,000 – nee-san-tvn-lha’-chvn

Siletz dee-ni numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from one to nine are specific words, namely lha’ [1], naa-xe [2], taa-xe [3], dvn-chi’ [4], srwee-la’ [5], k’wee-staa-ni [6], srch’ee-t’e [7], laa-nii-srvt-naa-ta [8], and lha’-duy [9].
  • Tens are formed by setting the multiplier digit, the word dvn (times) linked with hyphens, and the word for ten (nee-san), except for ten itself: nee-san [10], naa-tvn-nee-san [20], taa-tvn-nee-san [30], dinch-tvn-nee-san [40], srwee-la’-tvn-nee-san [50], k’wee-staa-nii-tvn-nee-san [60], srch’ee-t’ee-tvn-nee-san [70], laa-nii-srvt-naa-taa-tvn-nee-san [80], and lha’-duy-tvn-nee-san [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed by saying the ten, the unit name linked with hypens, and then the suffix ch’aa-ta (e.g.: nee-san-taa-xe-ch’aa-ta [13], naa-tvn-nee-san-k’wee-staa-nii-ch’aa-ta [26]). Some duplication of the last vowel of the unit may occur.
  • Hundreds are formed by setting the multiplier digit, the word dvn (times) linked with hyphens, and the word for hundred chvn, except for one hundred itself: lha’-chvn [100], naa-tvn-lha’-chvn [200] (2*100)…
  • One thousand litteraly means “ten times one hundred”: nee-san-tvn-lha’-chvn [1,000].

Write a number in full in Siletz dee-ni

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Siletz dee-ni. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Source

Athapaskan languages

Carrier, Dogrib, Hupa, Navajo, Siletz dee-ni, Tlingit, and Tolowa.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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