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Counting in Bavarian

Enter a number and get it written in full in Bavarian.

Language overview

Bavarian language (Boarisch), also known as Austro-Bavarian, is a group of Upper German languages of the Indo-European family. Comprised of three main dialect groups (Northern Bavarian, Central Bavarian and Southern Bavarian), it is spoken in Bavaria (Germany) and in some parts of Austria, Switzerland, Italy and Hungary. It counts about 13.25 million speakers.
Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 1,000 in Bavarian. Please contact us if you can help us counting up from that limit.

Bavarian numbering rules

  • Digits and numbers from one to twelve are specific words: oas [1], zwoa [2], drei [3], fiare [4], fimfe [5], sechse [6], sieme [7], åchte [8], neine [9], zene [10], öife [11], and zwöife [12].
  • From thirteen to nineteen, the numbers are formed from the matching digits, adding a form of the word for ten (zea, from zene) at the end: dreizea [13], fiazea [14], fuchzea [15], sechzea [16], sibzea [17], åchzea [18], and neizea [19].
  • The tens are formed by adding the suffix zge at the end of the multiplier digit, with the exception of ten and twenty: zene [10], zwånzge [20], dreißge [30], fiazge [40], fuchzge [50], sechzge [60], sibzge [70], åchtzge [80], and neinzge [90].
  • From twenty-one to ninety-nine, the tens and units are joined with the a (and) word with no space, the unit being said before the ten with some changes in the digit, as we can see in the following twenties: oanazwånzge [21], zwoarazwånzge [22], dreiazwånzge [23], fiarazwånzge [24], fimfazwånzge [25], sechsazwånzge [26], simmazwånzge [27], åchtazwånzge [28], and neinazwånzge [29].
  • The hundreds are formed by joigning the multiplier digit before the word for hundred (hundad), except for one hundred itself: hundad [100], zwoahundad [200], dreihundad [300], fiahundad [400], fimfhundad [500], sechshundad [600], simhundad [700], åchthundad [800], and neihundad [900].
  • The word for thousand is dausnd.

Numbers list

1 – oas
2 – zwoa
3 – drei
4 – fiare
5 – fimfe
6 – sechse
7 – sieme
8 – åchte
9 – neine
10 – zene
11 – öife
12 – zwöife
13 – dreizea
14 – fiazea
15 – fuchzea
16 – sechzea
17 – sibzea
18 – åchzea
19 – neizea
20 – zwånzge
30 – dreißge
40 – fiazge
50 – fuchzge
60 – sechzge
70 – sibzge
80 – åchtzge
90 – neinzge
100 – hundad
1,000 – dausnd

Sources

West Germanic languages

Afrikaans, Alsatian, Bavarian, English, German, Luxembourgish, North Frisian, Pennsylvania German, Plautdietsch, Saterland Frisian, Swiss German, and West Frisian.

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