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Counting in Odia

Language overview

Forty-two in Odia The Odia language (ଓଡ଼ିଆ, oṛiā), or Oriya, belongs to the Indo-European languages family, and more precisely to the Indo-Aryan languages. Co-official language of India with English, alongside 22 scheduled languages, it is the official language in Odisha (aka Orissa) and West Bengal, and the second official language in the Indian state of Jharkhand. Odia counts about 60 million speakers. It is written in the Odia script.

Odia numbers list

  • 0 – ୦
  • 1 – ୧ ଏକ (eka)
  • 2 – ୨ ଦୁଇ (dui)
  • 3 – ୩ ତିନି (tini)
  • 4 – ୪ ଚାରି (cāri)
  • 5 – ୫ ପାଞ୍ଚ (pāṅca)
  • 6 – ୬ ଛଅ (chaa)
  • 7 – ୭ ସାତ (sāta)
  • 8 – ୮ ଆଠ (āṭha)
  • 9 – ୯ ନଅ (naa)
  • 10 – ୧୦ ନଅ (daśa)
  • 11 – ୧୧ ଏଗାର (egāra)
  • 12 – ୧୨ ବାର (bāra)
  • 13 – ୧୩ ତେର (tera)
  • 14 – ୧୪ ଚଉଦ (cauda)
  • 15 – ୧୫ ପନ୍ଦର (pandara)
  • 16 – ୧୬ ଷୋହଳ (ṣohaḷa)
  • 17 – ୧୭ ସତର (satara)
  • 18 – ୧୮ ଅଠର (aṭhara)
  • 19 – ୧୯ ଊଣାଇଶ (ūṇāiśa)
  • 20 – ୨୦ କୋଡିଏ (koḍue)
  • 30 – ୩୦ ତିରିଶି (tiriśi)
  • 40 – ୪୦ ଚାଳିଶି (cāḷiśi)
  • 50 – ୫୦ ପଚାଶ (pacāśa)
  • 60 – ୬୦ ଷାଠିଏ (ṣāṭhie)
  • 70 – ୭୦ ସତୂରୀ (satūrī)
  • 80 – ୮୦ ଅଶୀ (aśī)
  • 90 – ୯୦ ନବେ (nabe)
  • 100 – ୧୦୦ ଶହେ (śahe)
  • 1,000 – ୧,୦୦୦ ହଜାର (hajār)
  • one hundred thousand – ୧,୦୦,୦୦୦ ଲକ୍ଷ (lakṣa)

Odia numerals

0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9

Odia numbering rules

  • Digits from zero to nine have specific words: ଶୁନ୍ୟ (୦, śunẏa) [0], ଏକ (୧, eka) [1], ଦୁଇ (୨, dui) [2], ତିନି (୩, tini) [3], ଚାରି (୪, cāri) [4], ପାଞ୍ଚ (୫, pāṅca) [5], ଛଅ (୬, chaa) [6], ସାତ (୭, sāta) [7], ଆଠ (୮, āṭha) [8], and ନଅ (୯, naa) [9].
  • Tens have specific names too, but starting with the root of the multiplier digit, except for ten and twenty: ନଅ (୧୦, daśa) [10], କୋଡିଏ (୨୦, koḍue) [20], ତିରିଶି (୩୦, tiriśi) [30], ଚାଳିଶି (୪୦, cāḷiśi) [40], ପଚାଶ (୫୦, pacāśa) [50], ଷାଠିଏ (୬୦, ṣāṭhie) [60], ସତୂରୀ (୭୦, satūrī) [70], ଅଶୀ (୮୦, aśī) [80], and ନବେ (୯୦, nabe) [90].
  • Teens are rendered by specific words too, starting with the unit root and ending with (ra), except for sixteen and nineteen: ଏଗାର (୧୧, egāra) [11], ବାର (୧୨, bāra) [12], ତେର (୧୩, tera) [13], ଚଉଦ (୧୪, cauda) [14], ପନ୍ଦର (୧୫, pandara) [15], ଷୋହଳ (୧୬, ṣohaḷa) [16], ସତର (୧୭, satara) [17], ଅଠର (୧୮, aṭhara) [18], and ଊଣାଇଶ (୧୯, ūṇāiśa) [19].
  • Compound numbers above twenty-one are quite regular, starting with the unit root and ending with the ten, with a lot of vowel change. The numbers ending with nine are suffixed by the following ten. Hence here is the full list of them:
    • From 21 to 29: ଏକୋଇଶି (୨୧, ekoiśi) [21], ବାଇଶି (୨୨, bāiśi) [22], ତେଇଶି (୨୩, teiśi) [23], ଚବିଶି (୨୪, cabiśi) [24], ପଚିଶି (୨୫, paciśi) [25], ଛବିଶି (୨୬, chabiśi) [26], ସତାଇଶି (୨୭, satāiśi) [27], ଅଠାଇଶି (୨୮, aṭhāiśi) [28], and ଅଣତିରିଶି (୨୯, aṇatiriśi) [29].
    • From 31 to 39: ଏକତିରିଶି (୩୧, ekatiriśi) [31], ବତିଶି (୩୨, batiśi) [32], ତେତିଶି (୩୩, tetiśi) [33], ଚଉତିରିଶି (୩୪, cautiriśi) [34], ପଞ୍ଚତିରିଶି (୩୫, paṅcatiriśi) [35], ଛତିଶି (୩୬, chatiśi) [36], ସଂଇତିରିଶି (୩୭, saṁitiriśi) [37], ଅଠତିରିଶି (୩୮, aṭhatiriśi) [38], and ଅଣଚାଳିଶି (୩୯, aṇacāḷiśi) [39].
    • From 41 to 49: ଏକଚାଳିଶି (୪୧, ekacāḷiśi) [41], ବୟାଳିଶି (୪୨, baẏāḷiśi) [42], ତେୟାଳିଶି (୪୩, teẏāḷiśi) [43], ଚଉରାଳିଶି (୪୪, caurāḷiśi) [44], ପଞ୍ଚଚାଳିଶି (୪୫, paṅcacāḷiśi) [45], ଛୟାଳିଶି (୪୬, chaẏāḷiśi) [46], ସତଚାଳିଶି (୪୭, satacāḷiśi) [47], ଅଠଚାଳିଶି (୪୮, aṭhacāḷiśi) [48], and ଅଣଚାଶ (୪୯, aṇacāśa) [49].
    • From 51 to 59: ଏକାବନ (୫୧, ekābana) [51], ବାଉନ (୫୨, bāuna) [52], ତେପନ (୫୩, tepana) [53], ଚଉବନ (୫୪, caubana) [54], ପଞ୍ଚାବନ (୫୫, paṅcābana) [55], ଛପନ (୫୬, chapana) [56], ସତାବନ (୫୭, satābana) [57], ଅଠାବନ (୫୮, aṭhābana) [58], and ଅଣଷଠି (୫୯, aṇaṣaṭhi) [59].
    • From 61 to 69: ଏକଷଠି (୬୧, ekaṣaṭhi) [61], ବାଷଠି (୬୨, bāṣaṭhi) [62], ତେଷଠି (୬୩, teṣaṭhi) [63], ଚଉଷଠି (୬୪, cauṣaṭhi) [64], ପଞ୍ଚଷଠି (୬୫, paṅcaṣaṭhi) [65], ଛଅଷଠି (୬୬, chaaṣaṭhi) [66], ସତଷଠି (୬୭, sataṣaṭhi) [67], ଅଠଷଠି (୬୮, aṭhaṣaṭhi) [68], and ଅଣସ୍ତରୀ (୬୯, aṇastarī) [69].
    • From 71 to 79: ଏକସ୍ତରୀ (୭୧, ekastarī) [71], ବାସ୍ତରୀ (୭୨, bāstarī) [72], ତେସ୍ତରୀ (୭୩, testarī) [73], ଚଉସ୍ତରୀ (୭୪, caustarī) [74], ପଞ୍ଚସ୍ତରୀ (୭୫, paṅcastarī) [75], ଛଅସ୍ତରୀ (୭୬, chaastarī) [76], ସତସ୍ତରୀ (୭୭, satastarī) [77], ଅଠସ୍ତରୀ (୭୮, aṭhastarī) [78], and ଅଣାଅଶୀ (୭୯, aṇāaśī) [79].
    • From 81 to 89: ଏକାଅଶୀ (୮୧, ekāaśī) [81], ବୟାଅଶୀ (୮୨, baẏāaśī) [82], ତେୟାଅଶୀ (୮୩, teẏāaśī) [83], ଚଉରାଅଶୀ (୮୪, caurāaśī) [84], ପଞ୍ଚାଅଶୀ (୮୫, paṅcāaśī) [85], ଛୟାଅଶୀ (୮୬, chaẏāaśī) [86], ସତାଅଶୀ (୮୭, satāaśī) [87], ଅଠାଅଶୀ (୮୮, aṭhāaśī) [88], and ଅଣାନବେ (୮୯, aṇānabe) [89].
    • From 91 to 99: ଏକାନବେ (୯୧, ekānabe) [91], ବୟାନବେ (୯୨, baẏānabe) [92], ତେୟାନବେ (୯୩, teẏānabe) [93], ଚଉରାନବେ (୯୪, caurānabe) [94], ପଞ୍ଚାନବେ (୯୫, paṅcānabe) [95], ଛୟାନବେ (୯୬, chaẏānabe) [96], ସତାନବେ (୯୭, satānabe) [97], ଅଠାନବେ (୯୮, aṭhānabe) [98], and ଅନେଶତ (୯୯, aneśata) [99].
  • Hundreds are formed by stating the multiplier before the word for hundred (ଶହେ, śahe), separated with a space, except for one hundred: ଶହେ (୧୦୦, śahe) [100], ଦୁଇ ଶହେ (୨୦୦, dui śahe) [200], ତିନି ଶହେ (୩୦୦, tini śahe) [300], ଚାରି ଶହେ (୪୦୦, cāri śahe) [400], ପାଞ୍ଚ ଶହେ (୫୦୦, pāṅca śahe) [500], ଛଅ ଶହେ (୬୦୦, chaa śahe) [600], ସାତ ଶହେ (୭୦୦, sāta śahe) [700], ଆଠ ଶହେ (୮୦୦, āṭha śahe) [800], and ନଅ ଶହେ (୯୦୦, naa śahe) [900].
  • Thousands are formed by stating the multiplier before the word for thousand (ହଜାର, hajār), separated with a space, except for one thousand: ହଜାର (୧,୦୦୦, hajār) [1,000], ଦୁଇ ହଜାର (୨,୦୦୦, dui hajār) [2,000], ତିନି ହଜାର (୩,୦୦୦, tini hajār) [3,000], ଚାରି ହଜାର (୪,୦୦୦, cāri hajār) [4,000], ପାଞ୍ଚ ହଜାର (୫,୦୦୦, pāṅca hajār) [5,000], ଛଅ ହଜାର (୬,୦୦୦, chaa hajār) [6,000], ସାତ ହଜାର (୭,୦୦୦, sāta hajār) [7,000], ଆଠ ହଜାର (୮,୦୦୦, āṭha hajār) [8,000], and ନଅ ହଜାର (୯,୦୦୦, naa hajār) [9,000].
  • The Indian counting system (or more exactly the counting system the Indian subcontinent) groups the decimals by three only up to one thousand, then groups them by two beyond. This notation, coming from the Vedic Numeration System, applies to Odia. The large numbers are named as follow:
    • ଲକ୍ଷ (lakṣa): 1,00,000 (one hundred thousand, or 105);
    • ଦଶଲକ୍ଷ (daśa lakṣa): 10,00,000 (one million, or 106);

Books

Oxford English-English-Odia Dictionary Oxford English-English-Odia Dictionary
editors Oxford University Press (2017)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Learn Oriya in 30 Days Learn Oriya in 30 Days
by , editors Hippocrene Books (1993)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Indo-Aryan languages

Dzambazi Romani, Gujarati, Hindi, Kalderash Romani, Odia, Rohingya, and Romani.

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