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Counting in Laz

Language overview

Forty-two in Laz The Laz language (lazuri, or ლაზური ნენა in the Georgian alphabet) belongs to the Kartvelian languages family, and more specifically to its Zan branch. Spoken by the Laz people on the southeastern shore of the Black Sea in both Turkey and Georgia, the Laz language counts about 30,000 speakers. Laz counts five major dialects: Xopuri, Viǯur-Arkabuli, Çxaluri, Atinuri, and Art̆aşenuri. Laz has a written form in Turkey since 1984, developed by Fahri Lazoğlu and Wolfgang Feurstein, using an alphabet based on the Turkish alphabet. It can be written in the Mkhedruli script, or Georgian alphabet.

Laz numbers list

  • 1 – ar
  • 2 – jur
  • 3 – sum
  • 4 – otxo
  • 5 – xut
  • 6 – aşi
  • 7 – şkvit
  • 8 – ovro
  • 9 – çxoro
  • 10 – vit
  • 11 – vitoar
  • 12 – vitojur
  • 13 – vitosum
  • 14 – vitotxo
  • 15 – vitoxut
  • 16 – vitoaşi
  • 17 – vitoşkvit
  • 18 – vitoovro
  • 19 – vitoçxoro
  • 20 – eçi
  • 30 – eçidovit
  • 40 – jurneçi
  • 50 – jurneçidovit
  • 60 – sumeneçi
  • 70 – sumeneçidovit
  • 80 – otxoneçi
  • 90 – otxoneçidovit
  • 100 – oşi
  • 1,000 – şilya

Laz numbering rules

Now that you’ve had a gist of the most useful numbers, let’s move to the writing rules for the tens, the compound numbers, and why not the hundreds, the thousands and beyond (if possible).

  • Digits from zero to nine are rendered by specific words, namely sufuri [0] (from the Turkish sıfır), ar [1], jur (or cur) [2], sum [3], otxo [4], xut [5], aşi [6], şkvit (or şkit, şk’it, şǩit) [7], ovro [8], and çxoro (or nçxoro) [9].
  • The Laz language uses a vigesimal system for its tens: vit [10], eçi [20], eçidovit [30] (literally twenty and ten, 10+20), jurneçi [40] (2*20), jurneçidovit [50] (2*20+10), sumeneçi [60] (3*20), sumeneçidovit [70] (3*20+10), otxoneçi [80] (4*20), and otxoneçidovit [90] (4*20+10).
  • Compound numbers are formed starting with the ten, directly followed by the conjunction do or o if the ten ends with a t, and the unit (e.g.: vitoxut [15], eçidoşkvit [27], otxoneçidovitoçxoro [99]).
  • Hundreds are formed starting by the multiplier unit, followed by the word for hundred (oşi), separated with a space, except for one hundred: oşi [100], jur oşi [200], sum oşi [300], otxo oşi [400], xut oşi [500], aşi oşi [600], şkvit oşi [700], ovro oşi [800], and çxoro oşi [900].
  • Thousands are formed starting by the multiplier unit, followed by the word for thousand (şilya), separated with a space, except for one thousand: şilya [1,000], jur şilya [2,000], sum şilya [3,000], otxo şilya [4,000], xut şilya [5,000], aşi şilya [6,000], şkvit şilya [7,000], ovro şilya [8,000], and çxoro şilya [9,000]. Another word for thousand exists: vitoşi, literally ten hundred.
  • Higher scale numbers names come from Turkish: milyon (plural: milyoni) [million, 106], milyar (plural: milyari) [billion, 109], and trilyon (plural: trilyoni) [trillion, 1012].

Write a number in full in Laz

Let’s move now to the practice of the numbering rules in Laz. Will you guess how to write a number in full? Enter a number and try to write it down in your head, or maybe on a piece of paper, before displaying the result.

Kartvelian languages

Georgian, and Laz.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

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