Share:  

Counting in Belarusian

Language overview

Forty-two in Belarusian Belarusian (Беларуская мова, transliterated as biełaruskaja mova) belongs to the East Slavic group of the Indo-European family. Official language in Belarus, alongside Russian, it counts about 5.1 million speakers. The Belarusian language is written in a variation of the Cyrillic script counting 32 letters.

Belarusian numbers list

  • 1 – адзі́н (adzín)
  • 2 – два (dva)
  • 3 – тры (try)
  • 4 – чаты́ры (čatýry)
  • 5 – пяць (pjacʹ)
  • 6 – шэсць (šescʹ)
  • 7 – сем (sjem)
  • 8 – во́сем (vósjem)
  • 9 – дзе́вяць (dzjévjacʹ)
  • 10 – дзе́сяць (dzjésjacʹ)
  • 11 – адзіна́ццаць (adzináccacʹ)
  • 12 – двана́ццаць (dvanáccacʹ)
  • 13 – трына́ццаць (trynáccacʹ)
  • 14 – чатырна́ццаць (čatyrnáccacʹ)
  • 15 – пятна́ццаць (pjatnáccacʹ)
  • 16 – шасна́ццаць (šasnáccacʹ)
  • 17 – сямна́ццаць (sjamnáccacʹ)
  • 18 – васямна́ццаць (vasjamnáccacʹ)
  • 19 – дзевятна́ццаць (dzjevjatnáccacʹ)
  • 20 – два́ццаць (dváccacʹ)
  • 30 – тры́ццаць (trýccacʹ)
  • 40 – со́рак (sórak)
  • 50 – пяцьдзеся́т (pjacʹdzjesját)
  • 60 – шэ́сцьдзесят (šéscʹdzjesjat)
  • 70 – се́мдзесят (sjémdzjesjat)
  • 80 – во́семдзесят (vósjemdzjesjat)
  • 90 – дзевяно́ста (dzjevjanósta)
  • 100 – сто (sto)
  • 1,000 – ты́сяча (týsjača)

Belarusian numbering rules

  • Digits from zero to nine are specific words, namely нуль (nulʹ) [0], адзі́н (adzín)/адна́ (adná)/одно́ (odnó) (m/f/n) [1], два (dva)/дзве (dzvje)/два (dva) [2], тры (try) [3], чаты́ры (čatýry) [4], пяць (pjacʹ) [5], шэсць (šescʹ) [6], сем (sjem) [7], во́сем (vósjem) [8], and дзе́вяць (dzjévjacʹ) [9]
  • The tens are formed by adding the word for ten (дзесят, dzjesjat) at the end of the digits from fifty to eighty, the other tens being quite irregular: дзе́сяць (dzjésjacʹ) [10], два́ццаць (dváccacʹ) [20], тры́ццаць (trýccacʹ) [30], со́рак (sórak) [40], пяцьдзеся́т (pjacʹdzjesját) [50], шэ́сцьдзесят (šéscʹdzjesjat) [60], се́мдзесят (sjémdzjesjat) [70], во́семдзесят (vósjemdzjesjat) [80], and дзевяно́ста (dzjevjanósta) [90].
  • Numbers form eleven to nineteen are formed starting with the unit, directly followed by -на́ццаць (-náccac): адзіна́ццаць (adzináccacʹ) [11], двана́ццаць (dvanáccacʹ) [12], трына́ццаць (trynáccacʹ) [13], чатырна́ццаць (čatyrnáccacʹ) [14], пятна́ццаць (pjatnáccacʹ) [15], шасна́ццаць (šasnáccacʹ) [16], сямна́ццаць (sjamnáccacʹ) [17], васямна́ццаць (vasjamnáccacʹ) [18], and дзевятна́ццаць (dzjevjatnáccacʹ) [19].
  • Compound numbers are formed by saying the ten, then the digit separated by a space (e.g.: два́ццаць тры (dváccacʹ try) [23], дзевяно́ста дзе́вяць (dzjevjanósta dzjévjacʹ) [99]).
  • Hundreds are formed by setting the multiplier digit before the word for hundred (сто, sto) which takes different forms, except for one hundred: сто (sto) [100], дзве́сце (dzvjéscje) [200], тры́ста (trýsta) [300], чаты́рыста (čatýrysta) [400], пяцьсо́т (pjacʹsót) [500], шэсцьсо́т (šescʹsót) [600], семсо́т (sjemsót) [700], восемсо́т (vosjemsót) [800], and дзевяцьсо́т (dzjevjacʹsót) [900].
  • Thousands are formed by setting the multiplier digit before the word for thousand (ты́сяча, týsjača), except for one thousand. It takes a different form after the multipliers two, three and four: ты́сяча (týsjača) [1,000], дзве ты́сячы (dzvje týsjačy) [2,000], тры ты́сячы (try týsjačy) [3,000], чаты́ры ты́сячы (čatýry týsjačy) [4,000], пяць ты́сяч (pjacʹ týsjač) [5,000], шэсць ты́сяч (šescʹ týsjač) [6,000], сем ты́сяч (sjem týsjač) [7,000], во́сем ты́сяч (vósjem týsjač) [8,000], and дзе́вяць ты́сяч (dzjévjacʹ týsjač) [9,000].
  • The word for million is мільён (milʹjón), and the word for billion is мілья́рд (milʹjárd).

Write a number in full in Belarusian

Enter a number and get it written in full in Belarusian.

Books

Belarusian for beginners: A book in 2 languagesBelarusian for beginners: A book in 2 languages
by , editors 50LANGUAGES LLC (2017)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Belarusian Language: The Belarusian PhrasebookBelarusian Language: The Belarusian Phrasebook
by , editors CreateSpace (2016)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Parlons biélorussien : langue et cultureParlons biélorussien : langue et culture
by , editors L’Harmattan (1997)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

East Slavic languages

Belarusian, Russian, and Ukrainian.

Other supported languages

Languages classified by languages families
As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the following select box, or from the full list of supported languages.

This site uses cookies for statistical and advertising purposes. By using this site, you accept the use of cookies.