Share:  

Counting in Belarusian

Language overview

Forty-two in Belarusian Belarusian (Беларуская мова, transliterated as biełaruskaja mova) belongs to the East Slavic group of the Indo-European family. Official language in Belarus, alongside Russian, it counts about 5.1 million speakers. The Belarusian language is written in a variation of the Cyrillic script counting 32 letters.

Belarusian numbers list

  • 1 – адзі́н (adzín)
  • 2 – два (dva)
  • 3 – тры (try)
  • 4 – чаты́ры (čatýry)
  • 5 – пяць (pjacʹ)
  • 6 – шэсць (šescʹ)
  • 7 – сем (sjem)
  • 8 – во́сем (vósjem)
  • 9 – дзе́вяць (dzjévjacʹ)
  • 10 – дзе́сяць (dzjésjacʹ)
  • 11 – адзіна́ццаць (adzináccacʹ)
  • 12 – двана́ццаць (dvanáccacʹ)
  • 13 – трына́ццаць (trynáccacʹ)
  • 14 – чатырна́ццаць (čatyrnáccacʹ)
  • 15 – пятна́ццаць (pjatnáccacʹ)
  • 16 – шасна́ццаць (šasnáccacʹ)
  • 17 – сямна́ццаць (sjamnáccacʹ)
  • 18 – васямна́ццаць (vasjamnáccacʹ)
  • 19 – дзевятна́ццаць (dzjevjatnáccacʹ)
  • 20 – два́ццаць (dváccacʹ)
  • 30 – тры́ццаць (trýccacʹ)
  • 40 – со́рак (sórak)
  • 50 – пяцьдзеся́т (pjacʹdzjesját)
  • 60 – шэ́сцьдзесят (šéscʹdzjesjat)
  • 70 – се́мдзесят (sjémdzjesjat)
  • 80 – во́семдзесят (vósjemdzjesjat)
  • 90 – дзевяно́ста (dzjevjanósta)
  • 100 – сто (sto)
  • 1,000 – ты́сяча (týsjača)

Belarusian numbering rules

  • Digits from zero to nine are specific words, namely нуль (nulʹ) [0], адзі́н (adzín)/адна́ (adná)/одно́ (odnó) (m/f/n) [1], два (dva)/дзве (dzvje)/два (dva) [2], тры (try) [3], чаты́ры (čatýry) [4], пяць (pjacʹ) [5], шэсць (šescʹ) [6], сем (sjem) [7], во́сем (vósjem) [8], and дзе́вяць (dzjévjacʹ) [9]
  • The tens are formed by adding the word for ten (дзесят, dzjesjat) at the end of the digits from fifty to eighty, the other tens being quite irregular: дзе́сяць (dzjésjacʹ) [10], два́ццаць (dváccacʹ) [20], тры́ццаць (trýccacʹ) [30], со́рак (sórak) [40], пяцьдзеся́т (pjacʹdzjesját) [50], шэ́сцьдзесят (šéscʹdzjesjat) [60], се́мдзесят (sjémdzjesjat) [70], во́семдзесят (vósjemdzjesjat) [80], and дзевяно́ста (dzjevjanósta) [90].
  • Numbers form eleven to nineteen are formed starting with the unit, directly followed by -на́ццаць (-náccac): адзіна́ццаць (adzináccacʹ) [11], двана́ццаць (dvanáccacʹ) [12], трына́ццаць (trynáccacʹ) [13], чатырна́ццаць (čatyrnáccacʹ) [14], пятна́ццаць (pjatnáccacʹ) [15], шасна́ццаць (šasnáccacʹ) [16], сямна́ццаць (sjamnáccacʹ) [17], васямна́ццаць (vasjamnáccacʹ) [18], and дзевятна́ццаць (dzjevjatnáccacʹ) [19].
  • Compound numbers are formed by saying the ten, then the digit separated by a space (e.g.: два́ццаць тры (dváccacʹ try) [23], дзевяно́ста дзе́вяць (dzjevjanósta dzjévjacʹ) [99]).
  • Hundreds are formed by setting the multiplier digit before the word for hundred (сто, sto) which takes different forms, except for one hundred: сто (sto) [100], дзве́сце (dzvjéscje) [200], тры́ста (trýsta) [300], чаты́рыста (čatýrysta) [400], пяцьсо́т (pjacʹsót) [500], шэсцьсо́т (šescʹsót) [600], семсо́т (sjemsót) [700], восемсо́т (vosjemsót) [800], and дзевяцьсо́т (dzjevjacʹsót) [900].
  • Thousands are formed by setting the multiplier digit before the word for thousand (ты́сяча, týsjača), except for one thousand. It takes a different form after the multipliers two, three and four: ты́сяча (týsjača) [1,000], дзве ты́сячы (dzvje týsjačy) [2,000], тры ты́сячы (try týsjačy) [3,000], чаты́ры ты́сячы (čatýry týsjačy) [4,000], пяць ты́сяч (pjacʹ týsjač) [5,000], шэсць ты́сяч (šescʹ týsjač) [6,000], сем ты́сяч (sjem týsjač) [7,000], во́сем ты́сяч (vósjem týsjač) [8,000], and дзе́вяць ты́сяч (dzjévjacʹ týsjač) [9,000].
  • The word for million is мільён (milʹjón), and the word for billion is мілья́рд (milʹjárd).

Write a number in full in Belarusian

Enter a number and get it written in full in Belarusian.

Books

Belarusian for beginners: A book in 2 languages Belarusian for beginners: A book in 2 languages
by , editors 50LANGUAGES LLC (2017)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Belarusian Language: The Belarusian Phrasebook Belarusian Language: The Belarusian Phrasebook
by , editors CreateSpace (2016)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Parlons biélorussien : langue et culture Parlons biélorussien : langue et culture
by , editors L’Harmattan (1997)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

East Slavic languages

Belarusian, Russian, and Ukrainian.

Other supported languages

As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the full list of supported languages.

This site uses cookies for statistical and advertising purposes. By using this site, you accept the use of cookies.