Share:    

Counting in Cherokee

Enter a number and get it written in full in Cherokee.

Language overview

Cherokee (ᏣᎳᎩ, transliterated as tsalagi) is an Iroquoian language written with a unique syllabary writing system devised by Sequoyah in 1819. It is nowadays spoken by about 20,000 people.
Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 999,999 in Cherokee. Please contact us if you can help us counting up from that limit.

Cherokee numerals

The Cherokee council voted not to adopt the numeric characters Sequoyah designed in his syllabary writing system, but the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma, still possess in its collections the original characters.

1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12

Cherokee numbering rules

  • Numbers from zero to ten are specific words, namely Ꮭ ᎪᏍᏗ (tla gosdi) [0] (meaning nothing), ᏐᏬ (sowo) [1], ᏔᎵ (tali) [2], ᏦᎢ (tsoi) [3], ᏅᎩ (nvgi) [4], ᎯᏍᎩ (hisgi) [5], ᏑᏓᎵ (sudali) [6], ᎦᎵᏉᎩ (galiquogi) [7], ᏧᏁᎳ (tsunela) [8], ᏐᏁᎳ (sonela) [9], and ᏍᎪᎯ (sgohi) [10].
  • From eleven to nineteen, numbers are built by adding the suffix -Ꮪ (-du) after the unit which can slightly change phonetically: ᏌᏚ (sadu) [11], ᏔᎵᏚ (talidu) [12], ᏦᎦᏚ (tsogadu) [13], ᏂᎦᏚ (nigadu) [14], ᎯᏍᎦᏚ (hisgadu) [15], ᏓᎳᏚ (daladu) [16], ᎦᎵᏆᏚ (galiquadu) [17], ᏁᎳᏚ (neladu) [18], and ᏐᏁᎳᏚ (soneladu) [19].
  • The tens are formed by adding the suffix -ᎪᎯ (-gohi) at the end of the matching digit: ᏍᎪᎯ (sgohi) [10], ᏔᎵᏍᎪᎯ (talisgohi) [20], ᏦᎢᏍᎪᎯ (tsoisgohi) [30], ᏅᎩᏍᎪᎯ (nvgisgohi) [40], ᎯᏍᎩᏍᎪᎯ (hisgisgohi) [50], ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪᎯ (sudalisgohi) [60], ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪᎯ (galiquasgohi) [70], ᏧᏁᎳᏍᎪᎯ (tsunelasgohi) [80], and ᏐᏁᎳᏍᎪᎯ (sonelasgohi) [90].
  • From twenty-one to ninety-nine, the numbers are made by saying the ten with its last syllable (-Ꭿ, -hi) removed, then the unit (e.g.: ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏦᎢ (talisgo tsoi) [23], ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ (galiquasgo sudali) [76]). When composed with a ten, the digit one changes from ᏐᏬ (sowo) to ᏌᏬ (sawo) (e.g.: ᏦᎢᏍᎪ ᏌᏬ (tsoisgo sawo) [31] and not ᏦᎢᏍᎪ ᏐᏬ (tsoisgo sowo)).
  • One hundred is said ᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (sgohitsiqua). The other hundreds are made by setting the multiplier root before the one hundred word with no space: ᏔᎵᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (talisgohitsiqua) [200], ᏦᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (tsosgohitsiqua) [300], ᏅᎩᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (nvgisgohitsiqua) [400], ᎯᏍᎩᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (hisgisgohitsiqua) [500], ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (sudalisgohitsiqua) [600], ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (galiquasgohitsiqua) [700], ᏧᏁᎵᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (tsunelisgohitsiqua) [800], and ᏐᏁᎵᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (sonelisgohitsiqua) [900].
  • The word for thousand is ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ (iyagayvli). The thousands are built by writing the multiplier before the thousand word, exactly as in English (e.g.: ᏐᏬ ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ (sowo iyagayvli) [1,000], ᏔᎵ ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ (tali iyagayvli) [2,000], ᏦᎢ ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ (tsoi iyagayvli) [3,000]).

Books

Cherokee Language LessonsCherokee Language Lessons
by , editors lulu.com (2014)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com, Kindle - Amazon.com Kindle - Amazon.com]

Signs of Cherokee Culture: Sequoyah’s Syllabary in Eastern Cherokee LifeSigns of Cherokee Culture: Sequoyah’s Syllabary in Eastern Cherokee Life
by , editors The University of North Carolina Press (2007)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Sequoyah: The Cherokee Man Who Gave His People WritingSequoyah: The Cherokee Man Who Gave His People Writing
by , editors Houghton Mifflin Books for Children (2004)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com, Kindle - Amazon.com Kindle - Amazon.com]

Beginning CherokeeBeginning Cherokee
by , editors University of Oklahoma Press (1992)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Numbers list

1 – ᏐᏬ (sowo)
2 – ᏔᎵ (tali)
3 – ᏦᎢ (tsoi)
4 – ᏅᎩ (nvgi)
5 – ᎯᏍᎩ (hisgi)
6 – ᏑᏓᎵ (sudali)
7 – ᎦᎵᏉᎩ (galiquogi)
8 – ᏧᏁᎳ (tsunela)
9 – ᏐᏁᎳ (sonela)
10 – ᏍᎪᎯ (sgohi)
11 – ᏌᏚ (sadu)
12 – ᏔᎵᏚ (talidu)
13 – ᏦᎦᏚ (tsogadu)
14 – ᏂᎦᏚ (nigadu)
15 – ᎯᏍᎦᏚ (hisgadu)
16 – ᏓᎳᏚ (daladu)
17 – ᎦᎵᏆᏚ (galiquadu)
18 – ᏁᎳᏚ (neladu)
19 – ᏐᏁᎳᏚ (soneladu)
20 – ᏔᎵᏍᎪᎯ (talisgohi)
30 – ᏦᎢᏍᎪᎯ (tsoisgohi)
40 – ᏅᎩᏍᎪᎯ (nvgisgohi)
50 – ᎯᏍᎩᏍᎪᎯ (hisgisgohi)
60 – ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪᎯ (sudalisgohi)
70 – ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪᎯ (galiquasgohi)
80 – ᏧᏁᎳᏍᎪᎯ (tsunelasgohi)
90 – ᏐᏁᎳᏍᎪᎯ (sonelasgohi)
100 – ᏍᎪᎯᏥᏆ (sgohitsiqua)
1,000 – ᏐᏬ ᎢᏯᎦᏴᎵ (sowo iyagayvli)

Iroquoian languages

Cherokee, Mohawk, and Oneida.

Other supported languages

Supported languages by families
As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the following select box, or from the full list of supported languages.