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Counting in Mohawk

Enter a number and get it written in full in Mohawk.

Language overview

Forty-two in Mohawk The Mohawk language (Kanien’keha) is an Iroquoian language spoken by the Mohawk people, living in Canada (southern Ontario and Quebec) and United States (mainly western and northern New York). It counts about 3,500 speakers.

Due to lack of data, this program can only count accurately up to 1,000,000 in Mohawk. Please contact me if you can help me counting up from that limit.

Mohawk numbers list

  • 1 – énska
  • 2 – tékeni
  • 3 – áhsen
  • 4 – kaié:ri
  • 5 – wisk
  • 6 – ià:ia’k
  • 7 – tsá:ta
  • 8 – sha’té:kon
  • 9 – tióhton
  • 10 – oié:ri
  • 11 – énska iawén:re
  • 12 – tékeni iawén:re
  • 13 – áhsen iawén:re
  • 14 – kaié:ri iawén:re
  • 15 – wisk iawén:re
  • 16 – ià:ia’k iawén:re
  • 17 – tsá:ta iawén:re
  • 18 – sha’té:kon iawén:re
  • 19 – tióhton iawén:re
  • 20 – tewáhsen
  • 30 – áhsen niwáhsen
  • 40 – kaié:ri niwáhsen
  • 50 – wisk niwáhsen
  • 60 – iá:ia’k niwáhsen
  • 70 – tsá:ta niwáhsen
  • 80 – sha’té:kon niwáhsen
  • 90 – tióhton niwáhsen
  • 100 – énska tewen’niáwe
  • 1,000 – oié:ri tewen’niáwe
  • one million – énska million

Mohawk numbering rules

  • Numbers from one to nine are specific words, namely énska [1], tékeni [2], áhsen [3], kaié:ri [4], wisk [5], ià:ia’k [6], tsá:ta [7], sha’té:kon [8], and tióhton [9].
  • Tens are formed by putting the multiplier digit before the word for tens (niwáhsen), except for ten itself and for twenty (for which it is contracted): oié:ri [10], tewáhsen [20], áhsen niwáhsen [30], kaié:ri niwáhsen [40], wisk niwáhsen [50], iá:ia’k niwáhsen [60], tsá:ta niwáhsen [70], sha’té:kon niwáhsen [80], and tióhton niwáhsen [90].
  • The teens are formed by putting the word iawén:re after the unit name (e.g.: énska iawén:re [11], kaié:ri iawén:re [14]). In the other compound numerals, the ten is put first, then the digit (e.g.: tewáhsen wisk [25], wisk niwáhsen sha’té:kon [58]).
  • Hundreds are formed by saying the multiplier unit, then the word for hundred (tewen’niáwe): énska tewen’niáwe [100], tékeni tewen’niáwe [200], áhsen tewen’niáwe [300], kaié:ri tewen’niáwe [400], wisk tewen’niáwe [500], ià:ia’k tewen’niáwe [600], tsá:ta tewen’niáwe [700], sha’té:kon tewen’niáwe [800], and tióhton tewen’niáwe [900].
  • Thousands are formed like tens of hundreds, i.e. by saying the multiplier ten, then the word for thousand (tewen’niáwe): oié:ri tewen’niáwe [1,000], tewáhsen tewen’niáwe [2,000], áhsen niwáhsen tewen’niáwe [3,000], kaié:ri niwáhsen tewen’niáwe [4,000], wisk niwáhsen tewen’niáwe [5,000], iá:ia’k niwáhsen tewen’niáwe [6,000], tsá:ta niwáhsen tewen’niáwe [7,000], sha’té:kon niwáhsen tewen’niáwe [8,000], and tióhton niwáhsen tewen’niáwe [9,000].
  • In compound numerals, the hundred and the unit, and the thousand and the unit are linked together by the word tánon, meaning and (e.g.: énska tewen’niáwe tánon énska [101], oié:ri tewen’niáwe tánon énska [1,001]).
  • The word for million is million.

Books

Kanyen’Keha Tewatati: Let’s Speak MohawkKanyen’Keha Tewatati: Let’s Speak Mohawk
by , editors Audio Forum (1990)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Sources

Iroquoian languages

Cherokee, Mohawk, and Oneida.

Other supported languages

Supported languages by families
As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the following select box, or from the full list of supported languages.

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