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Counting in Czech

Enter a number and get it written in full in Czech.

Language overview

Forty-two in Czech The Czech language (čeština, český jazyk) is an Indo-European language that belongs to the West Slavic languages group. Official language in the Czech Republic, it is also a recognised minority language in Slovakia and Poland. In fact, it is even mutually intelligible with Slovak. The Czech language is spoken by about 10.6 million people.

Czech numbers list

  • 1 – jedna
  • 2 – dva
  • 3 – tři
  • 4 – čtyři
  • 5 – pět
  • 6 – šest
  • 7 – sedm
  • 8 – osm
  • 9 – devět
  • 10 – deset
  • 11 – jedenáct
  • 12 – dvanáct
  • 13 – třináct
  • 14 – čtrnáct
  • 15 – patnáct
  • 16 – šestnáct
  • 17 – sedmnáct
  • 18 – osmnáct
  • 19 – devatenáct
  • 20 – dvacet
  • 30 – třicet
  • 40 – čtyřicet
  • 50 – padesát
  • 60 – šedesát
  • 70 – sedmdesát
  • 80 – osmdesát
  • 90 – devadesát
  • 100 – sto
  • 1,000 – tisíc
  • one million – milión
  • one billion – miliarda

Czech numbering rules

  • Digits are specific words, namely nula [0], jeden [1], dva [2], tři [3], čtyři [4], pět [5], šest [6], sedm [7], osm [8], and devět [9]. The digits one and two are gendered forms: jeden/jedna/jedno and dva/dvě/dvě (masculine/feminine/neuter).
  • From eleven to nineteen, numbers are suffixed by -náct (-teen): jedenáct [11], dvanáct [12], třináct [13], čtrnáct [14], patnáct [15], šestnáct [16], sedmnáct [17], osmnáct [18], and devatenáct [19].
  • Tens are formed by adding ten (cet/desát) to the end of the multiplier digit root, with the obvious exception of ten itself: deset [10], dvacet [20], třicet [30], čtyřicet [40], padesát [50], šedesát [60], sedmdesát [70], osmdesát [80], and devadesát [90].
  • For numbers from twenty-one to ninety-nine, we state the ten, then the unit separated with a space (e.g.:dvacet tři [23], třicet dva [32]).
  • Hundreds are formed the same way as the tens, i.e. by setting a form of the word for hundred (sto/stě/sta/set, neuter) after the multiplier digit, except for one hundred itself: sto [100], dvě stě or dvě sta [200], tři sta [300], čtyři sta [400], pět set [500], šest set [600], sedm set [700], osm set [800], and devět set [900]. The form stě is a relic of the grammatical dual number; sta is the nominative case of plural, while set is the genitive case of plural.
  • Thousands follow the same rule, setting a form of the word for thousand (tisíc/tisíce, masculine) after the multiplier digit, except fo one thousand itself: tisíc [1,000], dva tisíce [2,000], tři tisíce [3,000], čtyři tisíce [4,000], pět tisíc [5,000], šest tisíc [6,000], sedm tisíc [7,000], osm tisíc [8,000], and devět tisíc [9,000]. If tisíc is the genitive case of plural (and also the nominative case of singular for 1,000), tisíce is the nominative case of plural.
  • Millions also follow the same rule, setting a form of the word for million (milión/miliony/milionů, masculine) after the multiplier digit, except for one million itself: milión [1 million], dva miliony [2 millions], tři miliony [3 millions], čtyři miliony [4 millions], pět milionů [5 millions], šest milionů [6 millions], sedm milionů [7 millions], osm milionů [8 millions], and devět milionů [9 millions]. Again, milionů is the genitive case of plural, and miliony is the nominative case of plural.
  • Quite expectedly, billions do follow the same rule, setting a form of the word for billion (miliarda/miliardy/miliard, which is feminine) after the multiplier digit, except for one billion itself: miliarda [1 billion], dvě miliardy [2 billions], tři miliardy [3 billions], čtyři miliardy [4 billions], pět miliard [5 billions], šest miliard [6 billions], sedm miliard [7 billions], osm miliard [8 billions], and devět miliard [9 billions]. Again, miliard is the genitive case of plural, and miliardy is the nominative case of plural.
  • The Czech language uses the long numeric scale to name big numbers, alternating the -ión and -iarda suffixes for the powers of ten multiples of three. Thus, we get milión (million, 106), then miliarda (billion, 109), bilión (trillion, 1012), biliarda (quadrillion, 1015)…

Books

Czech: An Essential GrammarCzech: An Essential Grammar
by , editors Routledge (2005)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Tchèque expressTchèque express
by , editors Éditions du Dauphin (2002)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

La langue tchèqueLa langue tchèque
by , editors Éditions Ophrys (2000)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Sources

West Slavic languages

Czech, and Slovak.

Other supported languages

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