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Counting in Wardwesân

Language overview

Forty-two in Wardwesân Wardwesân is an imaginary language spoken by the Ward people in the kingdom of Aghâr during the first and second centuries after Zaragabal. Created by the French Frédéric Werst, Wardesân is developed in his book Ward (1er et 2ème siècles), which is an anthology of their work in Kemarzan, their classic language. This book is bilingual, as the texts are written in both French and Wardwesân. It also contains a detailed grammar and a dictionary.

Wardwesân numbers list

  • 1 – ke
  • 2 – wer
  • 3 – yām
  • 4 – ber
  • 5 – akān
  • 6 – gen
  • 7 – awan
  • 8 – zena
  • 9 – dara
  • 10 – beth
  • 11 – kebeth
  • 12 – werabeth
  • 13 – yabeth
  • 14 – berabeth
  • 15 – akabeth
  • 16 – genabeth
  • 17 – awabeth
  • 18 – zenabeth
  • 19 – darabeth
  • 20 – kapht
  • 30 – yabēs
  • 40 – berbēs
  • 50 – akbēs
  • 60 – genbēs
  • 70 – awabēs
  • 80 – zenabēs
  • 90 – darabēs
  • 100 – ewān
  • 1,000 – thān
  • one million – tathān

Wardwesân numbering rules

  • Digits from one to nine are rendered by specific words, namely ke [1] (ken in its feminine form), wer [2], yām [3], ber [4], akān [5], gen [6], awan [7], zena [8], and dara [9].
  • Numbers from eleven to nineteen are formed by prefixing the word for ten (beth) with the root of the digit unit. The numbers eleven and from fourteen to seventeen are attested, the others are obtained using them as a model: kebeth [11], werabeth [12], yabeth [13], berabeth [14], akabeth [15], genabeth [16], awabeth [17], zenabeth [18], and darabeth [19].
  • Tens are formed by prefixing a form of the word for ten (bēs) with the root of the multiplier digit, except for ten and twenty. The only attested tens being ten, twenty, thirty and fifty, the others are deducted: beth [10], kapht [20], yabēs [30], berbēs [40], akbēs [50], genbēs [60], awabēs [70], zenabēs [80], and darabēs [90].
  • Compound numbers are formed by putting the ten, then the unit digit separated with a space (e.g.: kapht ke [21], yabēs wer [32]).
  • Hundreds are formed by prefixing the word for hundred (ewān) with the root of the multiplier digit, except for one hundred itself. The only attested hundreds being one hundred and three hundred, the others are deducted: ewān [100], werewān [200], yamewān [300], berewān [400], akewān [500], genewān [600], awanewān [700], zenewān [800], and darewān [900].
  • Compound hundreds are formed by linking the hundred and the following ten or unit with the conjunction ek (and): yamewān ek kebeth [311].
  • Thousands are formed by prefixing the word for thousand (thān) with the root of the multiplier digit, except for one thousand and two thousand. The only attested thousands being one thousand, two thousand, five thousand, and ten thousand, the others are deducted from them: thān [1,000], kaphwān [2,000] (literally, 20 * 100), yathān [3,000], berthān [4,000], akthān [5,000], genthān [6,000], awathān [7,000], zenthān [8,000], and darthān [9,000]. Higher thousands are formed the same way (e.g.: bethān [10,000], kebethān [11,000]).
  • One million is tathān (literally, 1,000 * 1,000).

Write a number in full in Wardwesân

Enter a number and get it written in full in Wardwesân.

Books

Ward (1<sup>er</sup> et 2<sup>ème</sup> siècles)Ward (1er et 2ème siècles)
by , editors Seuil (2011)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com, Kindle - Amazon.com Kindle - Amazon.com]

Other artistic languages

Atlantean, Atrian, Barsoomian, Dovahzul, D’ni, Giak, Hylian, Ithkuil, Itláni, Kēlen, Kiitra, Láadan, Na’vi, Shiväisith, Trigedasleng, Va Ehenív, and Wardwesân.

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