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Counting in Oneida

Enter a number and get it written in full in Oneida.

Language overview

The Oneida language (Onʌyotaʔa:ka) is an Iroquoian language spoken by the Oneida people, living in the U.S. states of New York and Wisconsin, and in the Canadian province of Ontario. Endangered language, Oneida counts about 200 speakers.
Due to lack of data, we can only count accurately up to 1,000 in Oneida. Please contact us if you can help us counting up from that limit.

Oneida numbering rules

  • Numbers from one to nine are specific words, namely úskah [1], téken / tékni [2], áhsʌ [3], kayé [4], wisk [5], yá·yahk [6], tsya·ták [7], tékluˀ [8], and wá·tlu [9].
  • Tens are formed by putting the multiplier digit before the word for tens or decades (niwáshʌ), except for ten itself and for twenty (for which it is contracted): oye·lí [10], tewáshʌ [20], áhsʌ niwáshʌ [30], kayé niwáshʌ [40], wisk niwáshʌ [50], yá·yahk niwáshʌ [60], tsya·ták niwáshʌ [70], tékluˀ niwáshʌ [80], and wá·tlu niwáshʌ [90].
  • The teens are formed by putting the word yawʌ·lé after the unit name (e.g.: úskah yawʌ·lé [11], kayé yawʌ·lé [14]). In the other compound numerals, the ten is put first, then the digit (e.g.: tewáshʌ wisk [25], wisk niwáshʌ tékluˀ [58]).
  • Hundreds are constructed by saying the multiplier unit, then the word for hundred (tewʌˀnyáwelu), except for one hundred itself: tewʌˀnyáwelu [100], téken tewʌˀnyáwelu [200], áhsʌ tewʌˀnyáwelu [300], kayé tewʌˀnyáwelu [400], wisk tewʌˀnyáwelu [500], yá·yahk tewʌˀnyáwelu [600], tsya·ták tewʌˀnyáwelu [700], tékluˀ tewʌˀnyáwelu [800], and wá·tlu tewʌˀnyáwelu [900].
  • In compound numerals, the hundred and the ten, and the hundred and the unit are linked together by the word ok, meaning on (e.g.: tewʌˀnyáwelu ok tékni yawʌ·lé [112], tsya·ták tewʌˀnyáwelu ok wisk [705]).
  • One thousand is skanutó·tslat, which means one box.

Books

The Oneida Creation StoryThe Oneida Creation Story
by , editors Bison Books (2000)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Oneida Indian Journey: From New York to Wisconsin, 1784-1860Oneida Indian Journey: From New York to Wisconsin, 1784-1860
editors University of Wisconsin Press (1999)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

The Oneida Indian Experience: Two PerspectivesThe Oneida Indian Experience: Two Perspectives
editors Syracuse University Press (1988)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Numbers list

1 – úskah
2 – téken
3 – áhsʌ
4 – kayé
5 – wisk
6 – yá·yahk
7 – tsya·ták
8 – tékluˀ
9 – wá·tlu
10 – oye·lí
11 – úskah yawʌ·lé
12 – tékni yawʌ·lé
13 – áhsʌ yawʌ·lé
14 – kayé yawʌ·lé
15 – wisk yawʌ·lé
16 – yá·yahk yawʌ·lé
17 – tsya·ták yawʌ·lé
18 – tékluˀ yawʌ·lé
19 – wá·tlu yawʌ·lé
20 – tewáshʌ
30 – áhsʌ niwáshʌ
40 – kayé niwáshʌ
50 – wisk niwáshʌ
60 – yá·yahk niwáshʌ
70 – tsya·ták niwáshʌ
80 – tékluˀ niwáshʌ
90 – wá·tlu niwáshʌ
100 – tewʌˀnyáwelu
1,000 – skanutó·tslat

Iroquoian languages

Cherokee, Mohawk, and Oneida.

Other supported languages

Supported languages by families
As the other currently supported languages are too numerous to list extensively here, please select a language from the following select box, or from the full list of supported languages.