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Counting in Chavacano

Enter a number and get it written in full in Chavacano.

Language overview

Chavacano or Chabacano, also known as Philippine Creole Spanish, is a Spanish-based creole language spoken in the Philippines. It has a Spanish vocabulary and a grammar based on Tagalog and Cebuano, with some Hiligaynon (or Ilonggo), Italian and Portuguese influences. It counts six different dialects (Zamboangueño in Zamboanga City, Davaoeño Zamboangueño or Castellano Abakay in Davao, Ternateño in Ternate, Caviteño in Cavite City, Cotabateño in Cotabato City and Ermiteño in Ermita), and about 485,000 speakers. Chavacano numerals are the same as Spanish, with the exception of one, one hundred and one thousand, which have slightly different grammatical rules.

Chavacano numbering rules

  • Digits and numbers from zero to fifteen are rendered by specific words: cero [0], uno [1], dos [2], tres [3], cuatro [4], cinco [5], seis [6], siete [7], ocho [8], nueve [9], diez [10], once [11], doce [12], trece [13], catorce [14], quince [15]. Compound numbers from sixteen to twenty-nine are regular, as they are named after the ten (or the twenty) and the unit digit. Diez y seis [10 and 6] is phonetically shortened with an apocope as dieciséis. The same applies up to twenty-nine: diecisiete [10 and 7], dieciocho [10 and 8]… veintinueve [20 and 9].
  • The tens have specific names based on their multiplier digit root except for ten and twenty: diez [10], veinte [20], treinta [30], cuarenta [40], cinquenta [50], sesenta [60], setenta [70], ochenta [80], and noventa [90].
  • The hundreds are formed by setting the multiplier digit before the word for hundred (ciento, and cientos in plural) separated with a space (a difference with Spanish), except for one hundred and five hundred: ciento [100], dos cientos [200], tres cientos [300], cuatro cientos [400], quinientos [500], seis cientos [600], sete cientos [700], ocho cientos [800], and nueve cientos [900]. Unlike in Castilian, the word cien is not used in Chabacano, as it is rendered by ciento, thus being a more regular language.
  • Tens and units are linked with y (and) (e.g.: cuarenta y seis [46]).
  • Thousands are formed putting the multiplier digit before the word fot thousand (mil) separated with a space, including one thousand itself (which is different from Spanish): un mil [1,000], dos mil [2,000], tres mil [3,000], cuatro mil [4,000], cinco mil [5,000]…
  • The Chavacano language uses the short scale system for creating large numbers names, in which every new word greater than a million is one thousand times bigger than the previous term. The word for million is millón, then we have un billón (109, the US billion), un trillón (1012, trillion), un cuatrillón (1015, quatrillion)…

Books

Los criollos de base ibericaLos criollos de base iberica
by , editors Iberoamericana (2003)
[Amazon.com Amazon.com]

Numbers list

1 – uno
2 – dos
3 – tres
4 – cuatro
5 – cinco
6 – seis
7 – siete
8 – ocho
9 – nueve
10 – diez
11 – once
12 – doce
13 – trece
14 – catorce
15 – quince
16 – dieciséis
17 – diecisiete
18 – dieciocho
19 – diecinueve
20 – veinte
30 – treinta
40 – cuarenta
50 – cinquenta
60 – sesenta
70 – setenta
80 – ochenta
90 – noventa
100 – ciento
1,000 – un mil
one million – un millón
one billion – un billón
one trillion – un trillón

Sources

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